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I have a class Character and two subclasses Warrior and Wizard.

class Character {

protected:
std::string m_name;
Weapon m_weapon;
int m_life;

 public:
 virtual void hit(Character& cible);

};

class Warrior : public Character{
 public:
 Warrior(std::string name);
 };

 class Wizard : public Character{
 public:
 Wizard(std::string name);
 };

I also have a class Weapon.

class Weapon {

protected:
std::string m_name;
int m_damage;
public:
Weapon();
Weapon(std::string name,int damage, int reloading_time);
int get_damage() ;

};

The hit function is:

void Character::hit(Character &cible){
cible.dec_life(m_weapon.get_damage());
}

and get_damage is simply:

int Weapon::get_damage() {
return m_damage;
}

The problem is that m_weapon.get_damage() returns the value -2 in the hit function for every character (warrior or wizard) even though its Weapon's damage is 10 or 15.

Main:

int main()
{
string character_name;
cout << "Warrior 1 : ";
cin >> character_name;
Warrior character_1(character_name);
cout << endl << "Wizard 2 : ";
cin >> character_name;
Wizard character_2(character_name);
character_1.hit(character_2);
}

Weapon Constructor:

Weapon::Weapon(std::string name,int damage, int reloading_time){
m_name=name;
m_damage=damage;
}

Warrior Constructor:

Warrior::Warrior(string name){
m_name=name;
m_life=100;
Weapon m_weapon("Rusted Axe",5,0);
cout << endl << "Warrior " << m_name <<" created." <<endl;
}

Wizard Constructor :

Wizard::Wizard(string name){
m_name=name;
m_mana=100;
m_life=100;
Weapon m_weapon("Apprentice Wand",10,0);
cout << endl <<"Wizard " << m_name <<" created."<<endl;


}

Any idea where I get it wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
Do you set m_damage to something other than -2? –  ta.speot.is Sep 3 '13 at 21:27
1  
what does the Weapon constructor look like and when do you set it on the character? –  Pete Sep 3 '13 at 21:27
    
Can you post your main function? –  hidrargyro Sep 3 '13 at 21:30
1  
Seems like it works to me –  Chemistpp Sep 3 '13 at 21:44
1  
@user2744550: This code constructs a local object m_weapon, which has no relation to class member m_weapon. You can't do it this way. –  AndreyT Sep 3 '13 at 22:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Nowhere in your code I see numbers 10 and 15. How do you expect the program to know that specific weapon's damage is supposed to be 10 or 15?

According to your code, class Weapon has a constructor that accepts the weapon's damage value. But you never use this constructor. Instead, you seem to be constructing m_weapon members using the default constructor of Weapon class, which simply leaves garbage in m_damage field.

You have to develop a way to perform a meaningful initialization of your m_weapon objects. At this point you seem to be hoping that the compiler somehow telepathically figures out the damage values for various weapon objects. Compilers cannot do that.

EDIT: What you do in your constructors is just construct a local m_weapon object, which has absolutely no relation to member m_weapon object. Your member m_weapon objects remain uninitialized (i.e. default initialized with garbage in m_damage). It is not possible to perform initialization of member subobject from a constructor body. Member subobjects can only be initialized from constructor initializer list (read about it in your C++ book or do a search). On top of that, you are only allowed to initialize immediate members of the class, meaning that m_weapon can only be initialized from Character's constructor. It is not possible to do it from Warrior's or Wizard's constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
The numbers 10 qnd 5 are used in the Warrior and Wizard constructors. I edited the OP with both constructors. –  user2744550 Sep 3 '13 at 22:12
    
Thanks a lot, I'll make some research about this point! –  user2744550 Sep 3 '13 at 22:44

Add a constructor in your Character class under protected section, like this one:

Character::Character(std::string& name, Weapon& weapon)
:    m_name(name),
     m_weapon(weapon)
{}

Then in you Warrior and Wizard constructor do this:

Warrior::Warrior(std::string& name)
:    Character(name, Weapon("Rusted Axe",5,0))
{
    m_life=100;
    cout << endl << "Warrior " << m_name <<" created." <<endl;
}

Wizard::Wizard(std::string& name)
:    Character(name, Weapon("Rusted Axe",5,0))
{
    m_life=100;
    cout << endl << "Wizard " << m_name <<" created." <<endl;
}
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