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The Python version of Google protobuf gives us only:

SerializeAsString()

Where as the C++ version gives us both:

SerializeToArray(...)
SerializeAsString()

We're writing to our C++ file in binary format, and we'd like to keep it this way. That said, is there a way of reading the binary data into Python and parsing it as if it were a string?

Is this the correct way of doing it?

binary = get_binary_data()
binary_size = get_binary_size()

string = None
for i in range(len(binary_size)):
   string += i

message = new MyMessage()
message.ParseFromString(string)

Update:

Here's a new example, and a problem:

message_length = 512

file = open('foobars.bin', 'rb')

eof = False
while not eof:

    data = file.read(message_length)
    eof = not data

    if not eof:
        foo_bar = FooBar()
        foo_bar.ParseFromString(data)

When we get to the foo_bar.ParseFromString(data) line, I get this error:

Exception Type: DecodeError
Exception Value: Too many bytes when decoding varint.

Update 2:

It turns out, that the padding on the binary data was throwing protobuf off; too many bytes were being sent in, as the message suggests (in this case it was referring to the padding).

This padding comes from using the C++ protobuf function, SerializeToArray on a fixed-length buffer. To eliminate this, I have used this temproary code:

message_length = 512

file = open('foobars.bin', 'rb')

eof = False
while not eof:

    data = file.read(message_length)
    eof = not data

    string = ''
    for i in range(0, len(data)):
        byte = data[i]
        if byte != '\xcc': # yuck!
            string += data[i]

    if not eof:
        foo_bar = FooBar()
        foo_bar.ParseFromString(string)

There is a design flaw here I think. I will re-implement my C++ code so that it writes variable length arrays to the binary file. As advised by the protobuf documentation, I will prefix each message with it's binary size so that I know how much to read when I'm opening the file with Python.

share|improve this question
    
I'm not exactly sure what you're trying to do with your loop, but you're going to raise a TypeError with that. You assign None to the name string, and then attempt to add a series of ints to it. In python, a string is a sequence of bytes, so any binary data should be safe in a string. Can you explain more clearly what SerializeAsString is doing wrong with your data? –  jcdyer Dec 7 '09 at 14:30
    
I've updated my question. –  nbolton Dec 7 '09 at 14:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not an expert with Python, but you can pass the result of a file.read() operation into message.ParseFromString(...) without having to build a new string type or anything.

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Python strings can contain any character, i.e. they are capable of holding "binary" data directly. There should be no need to convert from string to "binary".

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1  
This is not true anymore for Python 3. –  sorin Apr 3 '11 at 18:50

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