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This is probably an easy question but it's late at night and I can't get my head round this.

here's my code

$(document).ready(function () {

var items = getNumber();

for (var i = 0; i < items.length; i++) {

    var test = items[i].action;
    test();

}

});

function getNumber()
{

var items = [];

for (var i = 0; i < 5; i++) {

    var num = i * 10;

    items.push({ id: i, number: num, action: function () { alert(i) } });
}


return items
}

Could someone explain to me why the alert output is always 5? I want the alert parameter to be the index at the time it is added to the array. It seems like it is being dynamic.

If you could also post a solution how i could get this to work i would be extremely thankful

share|improve this question
    
There is only one variable called num for each getNumber execution. So whenever the "action" callback function executes the alert will display the last value assigned to the shared [among action callbacks] variable. The standard solution is to use a "double closure" to bind/close over to a new variable. – user2246674 Sep 3 '13 at 22:13
    
See stackoverflow.com/questions/750486/… , stackoverflow.com/questions/6425062/… and the related questions. – user2246674 Sep 3 '13 at 22:15
    
@user2246674 You mean i, not num (num is being copied into the object, i is being referenced). – bfavaretto Sep 3 '13 at 22:19
    
@bfavaretto You are correct, I did/do mean i. Whoops :> – user2246674 Sep 3 '13 at 22:29
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is a common issue with JavaScript variable scoping: new variables are only introduced in a new execution context and thus, in the problematic code, i is shared across all the action callbacks.

Anyway, here is the corrected code following the standard idiom:

function getNumber()
{
  var items = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    var num = i * 10;    
    items.push({
      id: i, number: num,
      // _i is a new variable for each callback
      action: (function (_i) {
        // use separate (one per callback) _i variable
        return function () { alert(_i) }
      })(i) // pass in current value for loop
    });
  }
  return items
}

Alternatively, if one doesn't like all the nesting, it's fine to use a "named" function to perform the same task. The key to point is that the closure is created (and returned from) a new execution context so that a different variable is closed-over:

function getNumber()
{
  function mkAction (i) {
      return function () { alert(i) }
  }
  var items = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    var num = i * 10;    
    items.push({
      id: i, number: num,
      action: mkAction(i)
    });
  }
  return items
}

Another approach is to use Function.bind from ES5:

function getNumber()
{
  var items = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    var num = i * 10;    
    items.push({
      id: i, number: num,
      action: (function (_i) { alert(_i) }).bind(null, i)
    });
  }
  return items
}

(Note that Function.bind can be emulated using a new execution context/closure even without native browser support. See the MDC documentation.)

See also:

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for such a detailed answer and for the quick response! It makes perfect sense :) – heymega Sep 3 '13 at 22:27

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