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I'm using couchDB and I'm starting to implement Authentication/Authorization. I found the best and simple solution is to pass credentials over a ssl connection, but I'm not so sure if this strategy will ensure that my site is really secure.

Could I keep this strategy, buy a real ssl certificate and deploy this in prodution?

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It should ensure security in transit; however, bear in mind that that is only one part of an overall system (for example, it doesn't protect against code or server compromises). –  Adrian Wragg Sep 3 '13 at 22:54

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As per my original comment, using SSL for passing credentials will ensure security in transit, so that aspect is valid.

A more important thought to bear in mind is that security covers a multitude of layers, and these credentials form only one part of your overall system. As a very simple example, you could have an entire site running over the most secure encryption available to man, but riddled with SQL injection attacks.

Think "security" at every level, not just one.

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I would make the call to _session to get the auth token/cookie. Then use that for subsequent authorization. It expires in 10 mins but you can bump that up in config. Of course your "real SSL cert" is definitely still a great plan in any solution :-)

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What if the final user disable cockie, is this a real problem? –  Claudio Santos Sep 4 '13 at 16:53
    
Yes that would be a problem. However you see "you need to enable cookies..." info/messages all the time. Could that work? –  Locohost Sep 4 '13 at 20:02
    
To avoid some bother messages I'm thinking to stay with my solution, but tks for your answer. –  Claudio Santos Sep 6 '13 at 1:41

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