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I've tried searching for an answer for this, but couldn't find an answer exactly... Here's the situation. I have a Class and a subclass, and I defined them like this:

public class Shape{
   public methodA{
     System.out.println("Hello!");
  }
}

public class Square extends Shape{
   public methodB{
     System.out.println("I'm a Square!);
  }
}

At main, I instantiate them like this but now I am unable to call methodB because I "gave" (not sure of the terminology here) it the type Shape:

Shape square = new Square();
square.methodB() // This doesn't work.

Did I just design this all wrong if I wanted to be able to also call the child class' methods? I'm doing it this way because I have many shapes inheriting from the Shape class, but I didn't want to import every single shape class to my project. I tried searching, but didn't find an answer in a way that I understood it. Thanks.

-RB

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I would make methodB an abstract method of Shape. –  jahroy Sep 3 '13 at 23:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to decide what you want.

The point of polymorphism is that you can abstract away details specific to the implementation by programming to what is in common (interface or base or abstract class).

Did I just design this all wrong if I wanted to be able to also call the child class' methods

I don't know your intent, but probably not. If you want to be able to call the child class' methods in this particular case, just change the reference type

Square square = new Square();
square.methodB() // This doesn't work.

If you in general want to be able to call methodB on any shape from anywhere, then you need to define methodB in Shape itself, not Square.

public class Shape{
   public void methodA{
     System.out.println("Hello!");
  }

  public abstract void methodB();
}

public class Square extends Shape{
   public void methodB{
     System.out.println("I'm a Square!);
  }
}

Now any shape is guaranteed to have a methodB method.

The key to remember is that when you instantiate an object, the reference type is the only one that is carried on. When calling Shape s = new Square(), the compiler only uses Square for its constructor. Once called, it forgets any knowledge about it being a square because you told it so. Therefore, s.methodB() won't compile because the compiler doesn't know if s is a square, a circle, triangle, etc. You told it to forget.

If there is something about squares that can only be used on a square, then the calling code needs to use the Square class and not Shape.

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Good answer. Especially this (which others have missed): "If there is something about squares that can only be used on a square, then the calling code needs to use the Square class and not Shape." –  jahroy Sep 3 '13 at 23:41
    
Thank you. This makes loads of sense. –  user2744735 Sep 4 '13 at 3:59

It doesn't work because methodB() isn't defined in the parent class, which is the Shape class. In order to fix this, you must create the method in your Shape class (or, more generally, any subclass of Shape) and then you could override that method in the Square class to change its behaviour. So you could modify it to look something like this:

public class Shape{

    public void methodA(){
        System.out.println("Hello");
    }

    public void methodB(){
        System.out.println("I'm a shape");
    }
}

public class Square extends Shape{

    public void methodB(){
        System.out.println("I'm a square");
    }
}

Now when you do Shape shape = new Square(); and invoke shape.methodB();, it will print "I'm a square".

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1  
If you don't want to implement methodB in Shape, you can make it abstract. –  jahroy Sep 3 '13 at 23:19
    
Thanks! Sadly, that'll mean that my 'Shape' class will get bloated with all the different methods in my subclasses, right? –  user2744735 Sep 3 '13 at 23:20
    
Well, not necessarily because a parent class should only possess attributes that are common within all child classes. Surely you could define separate behaviour for each of your subclasses, but then you will need to declare your variables as the subclass so you could invoke those defined behaviours. –  Josh M Sep 3 '13 at 23:21
    
If you have a list of methods that are common to all subclasses, simply define them as abstract methods of your Shape class. Then you can only implement them in the subclasses. –  jahroy Sep 3 '13 at 23:24
1  
We don't know whether or not methodB will be implemented by all subclasses. If it is, then it should be a method of Shape (possibly abstract depending on the situation). If it is not, then you shouldn't declare your object as a Shape unless you only plan to invoke Shape methods. Brad's answer explains the point I'm trying to make. –  jahroy Sep 3 '13 at 23:32

This will work:

Square square = new Square();
square.methodB();

As will this:

Shape square = new Square();
((Square)square).methodB();

The compiler can't allow your original version, because what if you did the following:

Shape square = new Circle(); // what!
square.methodB(); // What the heck happens here?

There isn't really a reasonable thing to do. So to prevent you from writing code like this, the compiler checks that all of your methods exist on the type of reference you are using. The type of square is Shape, and the Shape might not have a methodB, so you see the error.

In the first fix, we tell the compiler that square is of type Square, so it allows us to call its methods. This is useful if you know you need square's methods, and you create a Square.

In the second fix, we tell the compiler later that we know this thing is a Square, even though Java only knows it's a Shape. This is good if you have figured out (with code) that an object must be a Square, but it circumvents Java's typing help. This has a chance to fail; if you try to do this to a Circle, Java will throw a ClassCastException at Runtime.

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There is something reasonable that can be done: declare the methods in Shape and implement them in the subclasses. If the method only exists in the Square class, then you shouldn't try to declare your object as a Shape if you want to invoke Square specific methods. –  jahroy Sep 3 '13 at 23:28

Your design is wrong. If somewhere in the code you assigned some other child class object (which does NOT implement methodB()) to the Shape class variable and then called methodB(), what is Java supposed to do at that time?

Consider this:

class Animal { public void move() {} };
class Human extends Animal { public void talk() {} };
class Dog extends Animal { public void wagTail() {} };

void processAnimal(Animal a) {
  a.move(); // Valid: All animals can walk
  a.talk(); // INVALID: All animals are not known to be able to talk
  a.wagTail(); // INVALID: All animals are not known to be able to wag tail
}

void processHuman(Human m) {
  m.move(); // Valid: All animals can walk and Man is an animal
  m.talk(); // Valid: All humans can talk
  m.wagTail(); // INVALID: Humans can NOT wag tail
}

void processDog(Dog g) {
  g.move(); // Valid: All animals can walk and dogs are animals
  g.talk(); // INVALID: Dogs can NOT talk
  g.wagTail(); // Valid: All dogs can wag tail
}

// These are good. ProcessAnimal() expects an animal and all 3 arguments below are animals
processAnimal(new Animal());
processAnimal(new Human());
processAnimal(new Dog());

processHuman(new Animal()); // INVALID: Expecting a specialized Animal, namely Human, which can talk
processHuman(new Human()); // Valid
processHuman(new Dog()); // INVALID: Expecting Human, which can talk

processDog(new Animal()); // INVALID: Expecting a specialized Animal, namely Dog, which can bark
processDog(new Human()); // INVALID: Expecting Dog, which can bark
processDog(new Dog()); // Valid

Fix for you:

if (square instanceof Square) {
    Square identifiedSquare = (Square) square;
    identifiedSquare.methodB();
}

You can NOT avoid importing the Square class into you java file

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