Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm noticing that the length of table names affects performance during creation of those tables. Here is a code example that reproduces the problem:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <assert.h>
#include "sqlite3.h"

int main() {
  int i, sr;
  char table_query[1000];
  sqlite3* db;

  sr = sqlite3_open("test.db", &db);
  assert(sr == SQLITE_OK);

  sr = sqlite3_exec(db, "PRAGMA synchronous=OFF", NULL, NULL, NULL);
  assert(sr == SQLITE_OK);

  sr = sqlite3_exec(db, "PRAGMA journal_mode=OFF", NULL, NULL, NULL);
  assert(sr == SQLITE_OK);

  sr = sqlite3_exec(db, "PRAGMA temp_store=MEMORY", NULL, NULL, NULL);
  assert(sr == SQLITE_OK);

  sr = sqlite3_exec(db, "BEGIN EXCLUSIVE TRANSACTION;", NULL, NULL, NULL);
  assert(sr == SQLITE_OK);

  for (i = 0; i < 10000; ++i) {
  #ifdef LONG_NAMES
   sprintf(table_query, "CREATE TABLE `TABLE_%d_AKLKEKABCDEFGHIJK4C6F766520416C6C20546865205061696E204177617920496E636C204B796175202620416C626572742052656D69782020434452` (content);", i);
  #else
   sprintf(table_query, "CREATE TABLE `TABLE_%d` (content);", i);
  #endif

   sr = sqlite3_exec(db, table_query, NULL, NULL, NULL);
   assert(sr == SQLITE_OK);

  }

  sr = sqlite3_exec(db, "END TRANSACTION;", NULL, NULL, NULL);
  assert(sr == SQLITE_OK);

  sr = sqlite3_close(db);
  assert(sr == SQLITE_OK);

  return 0;
}

To Compile:
gcc main.c sqlite3.c -O3 -DLONG_NAMES -DNDEBUG
gcc main.c sqlite3.c -O3 -DNDEBUG

On my machine, when using relatively short table names like TABLE_{table #}, creation of a database with 10,000 tables takes approximately 14 seconds. These table names vary from 7 to a max of 11 characters.

When using relatively long table names like TABLE_{table #}_{some unique identifying name that adds 120 or so characters}, creation of a database with 10,000 tables takes approximately 60 seconds.

Creating the database with long table names took over 4 times longer!

Why is this the case? Is this expected behavior or a bug?

And since creating tables with long names negatively affects performance, this leads me to wonder if query performance on such a database would also be negatively affected. This SO answer seems to believe the answer is "no" with respect to MySQL, but no references are given.

Thoughts?

P.S.: I'm using the latest amalgamated version of sqlite (3.8)

share|improve this question
    
Are 10000 tables with 120-character names an actual use case? –  CL. Sep 4 '13 at 7:46
    
@CL Yes. This is an actual use case. Although it is possible to put all of this data into a single table, it greatly complicates other aspects of my implementation. I'd like to understand if something can be done to fix this table name performance problem before giving up and moving to a flatter database design. –  BigMacAttack Sep 4 '13 at 14:42
    
FWIW, I had to add -pthread -ldl on RedHat 6.4 with GCC 4.4.7 to link this example correctly, with SQLite 3.8.0.2. With short names, it takes 10.7s (3 runs) to create a 11MB test.db, while it takes 27.5s (3 runs too) to create a 15MB test.db with -DLONG_NAMES added. –  ddevienne Sep 4 '13 at 14:56

2 Answers 2

With the longer table names, the resulting empty database file is 4x larger, since the longer table names take up more space in the schema. It should come as no surprise that SQLite takes 4x longer to write 4x as much content.

Note that the table names are only stored once. So once you start adding content to the database, the relative size difference between the two will decrease, asymptotically approaching 1.0. The absolute difference in size between the two databases should remain constant.

share|improve this answer
    
"It should come as no surprise that SQLite takes 4x longer to write 4x as much content." - I'm not sure I agree with this statement. If I instead design the database to utilize a single table and describe the table names as rows, creating the database is much faster. An order of magnitude faster. The performance problem I'm describing specifically relates to creating tables. Longer entries in rows doesn't affect performance nearly as much as longer table names do. –  BigMacAttack Sep 6 '13 at 18:31

Longer table names take up more space in the sqlite_master system table (compare the file sizes). When SQLite goes through that system table to search for the table (or to check if the new table name already exists), more data needs to be read and compared.

However, when querying, SQLite loads the data from the system table only the first time the schema is actually accessed, so query performance will not be affected by much.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.