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I'm finding that I'm using WordPress quite a lot for the smaller portfolio sites. I'd like to fix my development cycle.

The main issue I'm having is understanding how to install multiple instances of WordPress on a single domain. The reason for this is the reluctance to keep setting up new domain names in Apache in order to separate the multiple sites I'm working on.

Let me be clear that I want different versions of WordPress with links to different databases, separate MySQL users etc. I don't need the MultiSite feature. I'm happy to leverage subdomains to achieve this, but ultimately I was hoping that I could install them on different paths:

www.devsite.com/wordpress1 -> WordPress Site 1

www.devsite.com/wordpress2 -> WordPress Site 2

To further complicate I'm running a Node proxy app that is listening on port 80, and redirecting requests to the correct port number (which Apache is listening on) using node-http-proxy.

So...

I have the correct path proxying to the correct port on Apache, but WordPress isn't playing nice with regards to its interpretation of the paths. I'm still in the 'installing' stage, and it is trying to access www.devsite.com/wp-admin/install.php instead of www.devsite.com/wordpress1/wp-admin/install.php.

Is it even possible to run completely different WordPress sites based on a different domain/directory path? Or will I have to utilise subdomains?

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So much as I know wordpress is not invasive or anything. If you install it in a directory of a domain, it will operate within that directory and not care if another directory on the same install level has its own installation running. You may need to update the htaccess file to point all requests to /wordpress1/index.php instead of the default index.php. Aside that I don't think anything else is required to achieve what you describe. I'm afraid I'm of no use on the node proxy thing though –  Kai Qing Sep 4 '13 at 0:51
    
@KaiQing thanks for the input. If it is a simple .htaccess re-routing, could you provide an answer with example contents of the .htaccess file and I will mark as answered if it works. If it doesn't work then I may have to accept that this is my node proxy application messing with it. –  shennan Sep 4 '13 at 0:54

1 Answer 1

Wordpress default .htaccess file may need to be updated to something like this:

# BEGIN WordPress
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /wordpress1/

RewriteRule ^index\.php$ - [L]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule . /index.php [L]
</IfModule>
# END WordPress

or possibly:

# BEGIN WordPress
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /

RewriteRule ^wordpress1/index\.php$ - [L]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule . /wordpress1/index.php [L]
</IfModule>
# END WordPress

I haven't tested any of this so officially this is just a theory. Since wordpress is local to the directory you install it in, it should not care about other directories on that same level having their own install

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Doesn't seem to work yet but will keep having a play around with it before moving on. No doubt your directives are fine, it's probably the Node proxy that is the issue. +1 for the time spent. –  shennan Sep 4 '13 at 1:15

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