Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The structure I am speaking of is the very last one. I get segmentation faults when I try to use it, and when I use sizeof to get its size 218369176 is returned.

typedef struct
{
unsigned long       a1; /* Last structure in group. */
unsigned long       a2; /* Next structure in group. */
char            rc; /* Representing character. */
short           st; /* Type of structure (purpose). */
short           pl; /* Privilege level required to alter. */
short           vt; /* Type of value (short, char, int, long, float, double, void*). */
union
{
    short       s;
    char        c;
    int     i;
    long        l;
    float       f;
    double      d;
    void*       p;
}           un; /* Union containing values to be stored. */
} index_struct;             /* Structure composing a table tree. */

typedef struct
{
unsigned long       sr;                             /* Script return value. */
unsigned long       ir;                             /* Interpreter return value. */
unsigned long       lc;                             /* Execution counter (text division interpreter stopped at). */
short           ai;                             /* Action identifier (current status of interpretation). */
short           pr;                             /* Script privilege information. */
char            st[65536 /* Change SCRIPT_TEXT_SIZE with this. */];     /* Segment containing script text. */
index_struct        lt[65536 /* Change LOCAL_TREE_SIZE with this. */];      /* Segment containing local tree. */
} script_struct;                                        /* Structure containing script state information and variables. */

typedef struct
{
unsigned long       us;                         /* Number of unjoined scripts. */
unsigned long       sn;                         /* Number of running scripts. */
short           es;                         /* Environment status. */
script_struct       sl[100 /* Change MAX_NUMBER_SCRIPTS with this. */]; /* Segment containing script list. */
index_struct        gt[65536 /* Change GLOBAL_TREE_SIZE with this. */]; /* Segment containing global tree. */
} environment_struct;

EDIT: by popular request, here is the entire source code file.

/*
 * BY:  Charles Edwin Swain the 3rd.
 * LANGUAGES:  C and (if I ever comment out certain sections of code) x86 Assembly.
 */

#include <stdio.h>

/*
#include <stdint.h>

const uint8_t CPUID_UNSPECIFIED = 0;
const uint8_t CPUID_SUPPORTED = 1;
const uint8_t CPUID_UNSUPPORTED = 2;

typedef struct
{
    uint32_t    maximum_standard_level;
    uint32_t    raw_vendorid[4];
    uint32_t    raw_processortypeORfamilyORmodelORstepping;
    uint32_t    num_extendedfamily;
    uint32_t    num_extendedmodel;
    uint32_t    num_type;
    uint32_t    num_family;
    uint32_t    
    uint32_t    raw_brandidORCLUFLUSHORCPUcountORAPICID;
    uint32_t    raw_featureflags_A;
    uint32_t    raw_featureflags_B;
    uint8_t features[64];
} CPUID_struct;
*/

/* These constants are associated with certain hard coded limits, and all must be the same to ensure proper functionality. */
const unsigned long SCRIPT_TEXT_SIZE    = 65536;    /* Size of segment containing script text. */
const unsigned long GLOBAL_TREE_SIZE    = 65536;    /* Size of segment composing global tree. */
const unsigned long LOCAL_TREE_SIZE = 65536;    /* Size of segments composing local trees. */
const unsigned long MAX_NUMBER_SCRIPTS  = 100;      /* Maximum number of running scripts in an environment. */

typedef struct
{
    unsigned long       a1; /* Last structure in group. */
    unsigned long       a2; /* Next structure in group. */
    char            rc; /* Representing character. */
    short           st; /* Type of structure (purpose). */
    short           pl; /* Privilege level required to alter. */
    short           vt; /* Type of value (short, char, int, long, float, double, void*). */
    union
    {
        short       s;
        char        c;
        int     i;
        long        l;
        float       f;
        double      d;
        void*       p;
    }           un; /* Union containing values to be stored. */
} index_struct;             /* Structure composing a table tree. */

typedef struct
{
    unsigned long       sr;                             /* Script return value. */
    unsigned long       ir;                             /* Interpreter return value. */
    unsigned long       lc;                             /* Execution counter (text division interpreter stopped at). */
    short           ai;                             /* Action identifier (current status of interpretation). */
    short           pr;                             /* Script privilege information. */
    char            st[65536 /* Change SCRIPT_TEXT_SIZE with this. */];     /* Segment containing script text. */
    index_struct        lt[65536 /* Change LOCAL_TREE_SIZE with this. */];      /* Segment containing local tree. */
} script_struct;                                        /* Structure containing script state information and variables. */

typedef struct
{
    unsigned long       us;                         /* Number of unjoined scripts. */
    unsigned long       sn;                         /* Number of running scripts. */
    short           es;                         /* Environment status. */
    script_struct       sl[100 /* Change MAX_NUMBER_SCRIPTS with this. */]; /* Segment containing script list. */
    index_struct        gt[65536 /* Change GLOBAL_TREE_SIZE with this. */]; /* Segment containing global tree. */
} environment_struct;                                   /* Structure containing environment state information and global tree. */

/*
 * Function definition and calling conventions follow:
 *
 *  - All non-interpreter functions should be called through a wrapper function.
 *  - This wrapper function's address is specified through the p field of an index_struct in the global tree.
 *  - The return items of the function are specified through the global tree, under 'f_retu'.
 *  - The arguments to the function are specified through the global tree, under 'f_argv'.
 *  - The number of arguments to the function are specified through the global tree, under 'f_argc'.
 *  - Before calling the wrapper function, these fields and the environment status are appropriately set.
 *  - The wrapper function takes a pointer to the segment containing the global tree as an argument (outside the interpreter).
 *  - The wrapper function sorts through the arguments and calls the appropriate function it is wrapping.
 *  - Once this function returns, it sets any actual interpreter buffers accordingly.
 *  - What is meant by the above is that the wrapper function will use temporary buffers in the call to the function, then transfer data over according to global tree arguments.
 *  - Once the wrapper function returns, the calling (interpreter) code should copy all data from the return to an appropriate location and wipe all involved tables (for security).
 *  - This entire state is uninterruptable by interruption code from the moment the interpreter begins the call to after the interpreter finishes wiping data.
 *  - The above does not include signals, and only describes with regard to the interpreter auto returning after interpreting some input.
 *
 */

/* Creates a fresh interpreter environment. */
int ecreate(environment_struct* environment)
{
    if (environment == NULL)
    {
        return -1;
    }
    else
    {
        if (environment->es != 0)
        {
            return -2;
        }
        else
        {
            environment->us = 0;
            environment->sn = 0;
            environment->es = 1;
            return 0;
        }
    }
}

/* Cleans up and shuts down an interpreter environment. */
int edestroy(environment_struct* environment)
{
    if (environment == NULL)
    {
        return -1;
    }
    else
    {
        if (environment->es == 0)
        {
            return -2;
        }
        else
        {
            environment_struct environment_B;
            *environment = environment_B;
            return 0;
        }
    }
}

/* Main function. */
int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
/* This is where the sizeof is.  Works fine when code behind next comment is not commented in.*/
    printf("%lu\n", sizeof(environment_struct));
/* Next comment. */
    environment_struct environment;
    int r_ecreate, r_edestroy;
    r_ecreate   = ecreate(&environment);
    r_edestroy  = edestroy(&environment);
    printf("%d, %d\n", r_ecreate, r_edestroy);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Show us more code, especially the line with the sizeof. –  nouney Sep 4 '13 at 0:08
1  
It is if you are trying to put it on the stack. –  Duck Sep 4 '13 at 0:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

index_struct will have a size of 24 bytes on your average 32-bit system (or 32 bytes on your average 64-bit system).

script_struct will have a size of 1,638,416 bytes (1.6 MB) on your average 32-bit system (or 2,162,720 bytes (2.16 MB) on your average 64-bit system).

environment_struct will have a size of 165,414,476 (165.4 MB) on your average 32-bit system (or 218,369,176 bytes (218.3 MB) on your average 64-bit system (which is the size you're seeing)).

That is an insanely large size for a struct, and very well might crash your system (particularly if you use it on the stack). If you allocate several environment_structs (on the heap), you could very well run out of memory.

So yeah, they're too large. Waaay too large.

Edit: Yup, you're declaring a environment_struct on the stack. A struct that big is insane for the stack.

share|improve this answer
4  
Due to alignment, on a 64-bit machine, index_struct is more likely to be 32 bytes. This accounts pretty accurately for his numbers. And the quick solution is to make it a global instead. –  Potatoswatter Sep 4 '13 at 0:16
    
Concur with @Potatoswatter. That's exactly what it is on my 64bit Mac. –  WhozCraig Sep 4 '13 at 0:18
    
Yeah, I was giving very conservative numbers (just to show that even when being very conservative, it's still problematic). I'll make a mention of that. –  Cornstalks Sep 4 '13 at 0:20
1  
I predict this answer will seem quaint in a few years. –  Keith Thompson Sep 4 '13 at 0:37
    
@Potatoswatter: I've edited it to include actual sizes on typical 32 and 64-bit systems. –  Cornstalks Sep 4 '13 at 4:46

Just a small addendum to Cornstalks' answer. On a 64-bit Intel system, the sizes would be, according to my calculations:

sizeof(index_struct) = 32
sizeof(script_struct) = 2162716
sizeof(environment_struct) = 218368770

Therefore, the result you get from sizeof are correct.

In your code, you are putting environment_struct on the stack. The stack space is usually fixed and quite limited - on my system it's just 8 MiB. If you really want to use such a gigantic structure, you should allocate the memory for it with malloc(). A better approach, which would also remove the rather arbitrary limit of 65536 scripts, would be to store a linked list or array of scripts allocated with malloc(), instead of reserving a fixed amount of space.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.