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I am taking an online C++ class and I am having a hard time learning. I am not sure what exactly I am doing wrong with my code for the below problem. I get the formula right if hours are = 40, but something is going wrong if hrs are above 40 or below 40. I appreciate your help! Cheers, R.

Problem:
if hrs <= 40 the regular pay = hrs times pay rate
if hrs > 40 then overtime pay = 1.5 times (hrs - 40) times pay rate
gross pay = regular pay plus overtime pay

// my code

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    //variable declarations

    int EmployeeIdentificationNumber = 0;
    double Hours = 0;
    double PayRate = 0;
    double GrossPay = 0;
    double RegularPay = 0;
    double OvertimePay = 0;


   std::cout << "Welcome to the Employee Payroll.\n"; // display message

    std:: cout << "Enter Your Employee Identification Number: "; //promp user for data
    std::cin >> EmployeeIdentificationNumber; //read integer from user into             EmployeeIdentificationNumber

    std::cout << "Please enter Hours worked: " ; // prompt user for data
    std::cin >> Hours; //read integer from user into Hours
    std::cout << "Please enter Pay Rate: " ; // prompt user for data
    std::cin >> PayRate; //read integer from user into PayRate

    RegularPay = Hours * PayRate; //calculate RegularPay
    OvertimePay = 1.5 * (Hours - 40) * PayRate; //Calculate Overtime

    //Qualifier for RegularPay

    if (Hours <= 40);
    RegularPay = Hours * PayRate;
   OvertimePay = 0;
   GrossPay = RegularPay + OvertimePay;
   std::cout << "Gross Pay is = $" ;

    //Qualifier for OverTime

    if (Hours > 40);
    RegularPay = Hours * PayRate;
    OvertimePay = 1.5 * (Hours - 40) * PayRate;
      GrossPay = RegularPay + OvertimePay;
    std::cout << RegularPay + OvertimePay << std::endl;

    std::cout << "Thanks for using the Employee Payroll\n";
    system("PAUSE");
  return EXIT_SUCCESS;

}

share|improve this question
1  
Raquel: Check again how if statements are supposed to look. –  Benjamin Bannier Sep 4 '13 at 1:00
4  
if (Hours <= 40); is wrong - you shouldn't have a semicolon at the end of the if - it means if (Hours <= 40) /* do nothing */ ; - which is nearly always NOT what you want. –  Mats Petersson Sep 4 '13 at 1:01
3  
@jev Why would you edit the code in the question to remove the errors!? This renders the answers obsolete... –  Borgleader Sep 4 '13 at 1:09
3  
And renders the question obsolete as well :-) –  paxdiablo Sep 4 '13 at 1:10
2  
@jev Fixing the format is fine. Fixing errors in the code is not it changes the nature of the question. Don't do that, it doesn't matter if it was a comment or not. –  Borgleader Sep 4 '13 at 1:13

3 Answers 3

Regarding your code snippet:

if (Hours <= 40);
    RegularPay = Hours * PayRate;
    OvertimePay = 0;

This doesn't do what you think. The ; at the end of the if statement means "if hours is less than 40, do nothing", then it sets regular and overtime regardless. What you probably wanted was:

if (Hours <= 40) {
    RegularPay = Hours * PayRate;
    OvertimePay = 0;
}

The whole calculation of regular and overtime pay can probably be better written as:

if (Hours <= 40) {
    RegularPay = Hours * PayRate;
    OvertimePay = 0;
} else {
    RegularPay = 40.0 * PayRate;
    OvertimePay = 1.5 * (Hours - 40) * PayRate;
}

GrossPay = RegularPay + OvertimePay;
std::cout << "Gross Pay is = $"  << GrossPay << '\n';

You can see that the correct values are set for regular and overtime pay for the two situations, after which you can add them and print them in any way you want.

Keep in mind this (the use of RegularPay = 40.0 * PayRate in the else clause) is for overtime being time-and-a-half as that's often the case.

If you work in an industry where it's double-time-and-a-half (i.e., you're very lucky), change the calculation to RegularPay = Hours * PayRate as per your original. That seems to be the way your description specifies it but you may want to check with your tutor or at least comment the reasoning.

If it is double-time-and-a-half, you can simplify the code to be something like:

RegularPay = Hours * PayRate;
OvertimePay = 0;
if (Hours > 40)
    OvertimePay = 1.5 * (Hours - 40) * PayRate;

GrossPay = RegularPay + OvertimePay;
std::cout << "Gross Pay is = $"  << GrossPay << '\n';
share|improve this answer

First things first, you shouldn't write:

     if(Hours <= 40);

because a semicolon after an if statement doesn't allow for the rest of the code (that you want to execute after the statement) to be executed. And you should put the rest of the code after if in curly braces

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Move printing the "Gross Pay is = $" outside as it is common for both conditions. Use begin curly braces instead of the semicolon, use end curly braces at the end of the code block that you want to execute for the code block. The code should be:

std::cout << "Gross Pay is = $" ;

//Qualifier for RegularPay

if (Hours <= 40){
    RegularPay = Hours * PayRate;
    OvertimePay = 0;
    GrossPay = RegularPay + OvertimePay;
}

//Qualifier for OverTime

if (Hours > 40){
    RegularPay = Hours * PayRate;
    OvertimePay = 1.5 * (Hours - 40) * PayRate;
    GrossPay = RegularPay + OvertimePay;
}
std::cout << RegularPay + OvertimePay << std::endl;
share|improve this answer

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