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I have trouble understanding the order of template instantiation. It seems that the compiler does not consider a function if it is defined "too late." The following steps illustrates the main ideas of the code below:

  1. The framework should provide a free function convert<From, To> if it can find a working overload for the function generate.

  2. The function to<T> is a shortcut for convert<From,To> and should only work if convert<From,To> is valid.

  3. Users should be able to provide an overload of generate and be able to use to and convert.

The corresponding code:

#include <string>
#include <utility>
#include <iostream>

// If I move the code down below at [*] to this location, everything works as
// expected.

// ------------- Framework Code -------------

// Anything that can be generated can also be converted to a string.
template <typename From>
auto convert(From const& from, std::string& to)
  -> decltype(
      generate(std::declval<std::back_insert_iterator<std::string>&>(), from)
      )
{
  to.clear();
  auto i = std::back_inserter(to);
  return generate(i, from);
}

// Similar to convert, except that it directly returns the requested type.
template <typename To, typename From>
auto to(From const& f) -> decltype(convert(f, std::declval<To&>()), To())
{
  To t;
  if (! convert(f, t))
    throw std::invalid_argument("invalid conversion");
  return t;
}

// ------------- User Code -------------

// [*] Support arithmetic types.
template <typename Iterator, typename T>
auto generate(Iterator& out, T i)
  -> typename std::enable_if<std::is_arithmetic<T>::value, bool>::type
{
  // Note: I merely use std::to_string for illustration purposes here.
  auto str = std::to_string(i);
  out = std::copy(str.begin(), str.end(), out);
  return true;
}

int main()
{
  uint16_t s = 16;
  std::cout << to<std::string>(s) << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

The problem in the following code is that it only works if the function generate appears before the definition of convert and to. How can I work around this problem?

Maybe my mental model is wrong here, but I thought the template when the compiler sees to<std::string>(uint16_t), it starts going backwards to and instantiate as needed. Any guidance would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The compiler does not know of the existence of generate by the time it sees the definition of convert and to, as you have already guessed yourself. Contrary to what you thought, it doest not though sort of put the definitions of convert and to "on hold" until it sees what generate is. To workaround this problem you need to forward declare generate, what can be done using the following construction:

template <typename Iterator, typename T>
auto generate(Iterator& out, T i)
  -> typename std::enable_if<std::is_arithmetic<T>::value, bool>::type;

This should appear right before the definition of convert, so that the compiler knows generate actually exists and also is a function by the time it compiles convert and to. This way the compiler can check the syntax and guarantee it is a valid call to generate, even before it knows what generate actually does, since all it needs to do at this point is check if the types of the arguments as well as of the return value match, according to the rules defined by the language standard.

By doing this, you naturally enforce a specific type signature for generate (remember the compiler is required to check the types when it compiles convert and to!). If you don't want to do that, and you probably don't, then the best approach is to expect a further template argument to convert and to likewise, which you expect to be callable, that is, which you can use as in a function call:

template <typename From, typename Generator>
auto convert(From const& from, std::string& to, Generator generate)
  -> decltype(
      generate(std::declval<std::back_insert_iterator<std::string>&>(), from)
      )
{
  to.clear();
  auto i = std::back_inserter(to);
  return generate(i, from);
}

These kind of objects are commonly known as callable objects.

The drawback to this approach is that because c++ unfortunately does not support concepts yet, you can't do much to enforce the requirements the callable object generate should attend to. Nonetheless, this approach is what the std library successfully uses for its algorithms.

The advantage of this approach is that it can be very flexible, for any possible callable object, which minimally attends to the type requirements, can be used. That includes free functions, function objects, member functions through binding, among others. Not to mention the user is absolutely free to choose the name she wants for her callable object instead of being forced to use generate, as your initial idea would require if it were valid c++.

Now to call this modified version of convert using the free function generateyou defined, you would do that:

to<std::string>(s, generate<std::back_insert_iterator<std::string>, uint16_t>);

That isn't very nice, because since you must explicitly state the template arguments, this approach fails to take full advantage of the fact generate is a template function. Fortunately this inconvenience can be overcome by the use of function objects, like the following for instance:

struct Generator
{
    template <typename Iterator, typename T>
    auto operator()(Iterator& out, T i)
      -> typename std::enable_if<std::is_arithmetic<T>::value, bool>::type
    {
      // Note: I merely use std::to_string for illustration purposes here.
      auto str = std::to_string(i);
      out = std::copy(str.begin(), str.end(), out);
      return true;
    }
};

The previous call would become simply

to<std::string>(s, Generator());

taking full advantage of its tamplate nature.

At any rate, if I got the idea correctly, this part of the code is of responsability of the user, so she, as she deserves, have full autonomy to decide which way she prefers.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the elaborate answer. I understand where you going with the indirection through callables. But is there a way to keep the interface simple so that users still can write to<std::string>(s)? In other words, is it possible to hide the callables behind the scenes? – mavam Sep 4 '13 at 16:27
    
@MatthiasVallentin I'm afraid not without strictly defining the signature of generate, like I've shown at the begining of my answer. The best you could do, if you take the callable objects path, would be to provide a set of default generators and associated specializations of convert and to. – brunocodutra Sep 4 '13 at 18:42

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