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I'm not sure if this question is specific to Backbone.js. I have a model with the following render function:

render: function() { 
    var self = this;
    this.$el.empty();
    this.model.fetch({
        success: function() {
            self.$el.append(self.template(self.model.attributes));      
        }
    });

    return this;
}

As you can see, inside the success callback function, I use a variable called self. This is because inside the callback, this is set to window when I want it to be set to the view. Is there a way I can retain the original reference of this without storing it in another variable?

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For small callbacks without inner callbacks you can use function.prototype.bind (or similar alternatives) but for larger chunks of code I recommend sticking with "self" or "that" because these lexically scoped variables continue to work even for nested callbacks. –  hugomg Sep 4 '13 at 3:28
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is there a way I can retain the original reference of this without storing it in another variable?

Yes, this is a reasonable use case for the proxy method

this.model.fetch({
    success: $.proxy(function() {
        this.$el.append(this.template(this.model.attributes));      
    }, this)
});

Alternatively you can use underscore's bind method:

this.model.fetch({
    success: _.bind(function() {
        this.$el.append(this.template(this.model.attributes));      
    }, this)
});
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1  
with $.proxy you don't need self anymore. use this in the success callback. –  gp. Sep 4 '13 at 3:26
    
And self is a terrible name for such things due to the presence of window.self. –  mu is too short Sep 4 '13 at 4:03
2  
@muistooshort, actually self is a very good choice. It's common, and descriptive. Just because window has a default property self doesn't mean that you shouldn't use self in other scopes. –  zzzzBov Sep 4 '13 at 5:13
    
And a simple missing var self = this leads to confusing errors that can easily be avoided by using a different name. –  mu is too short Sep 4 '13 at 5:34
2  
@muistooshort, "use strict" and you'll never run into that issue. –  zzzzBov Sep 4 '13 at 5:38
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Use the Function.prototype.bind function to bind your object to the this variable within a function.

render: function() { 
    this.$el.empty();
    var successFunc = function() { 
                 this.$el.append(this.template(this.model.attributes));      
    };

    this.model.fetch({
        success: successFunc.bind(this)
        }
    });

    return this;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
bind is not backwards compatible, $.proxy is. –  zzzzBov Sep 4 '13 at 3:24
1  
Good point. I'll leave my answer for those developers not using jQuery. Note that the implementation of bind is simple enough and provided at the MDN link, if you don't want to use a library which provides it. –  Chris Hayes Sep 4 '13 at 3:26
1  
@zzzzBov: But _.bind would be more idiomatic in a Backbone app. –  mu is too short Sep 4 '13 at 4:02
    
@muistooshort, I would say that _.bind and $.proxy are equally idiomatic. It really depends on whether you're coming from the underscore world or whether you're coming from the jQuery world. I tend to prefer $.proxy due to how event bindings are handled, but a call to bindAll can be very convenient as part of class initialization. –  zzzzBov Sep 4 '13 at 5:17
    
Wish I could give both of you guys best answer. This was a very thorough explanation/discussion and I have a much better understanding of how to use bind now. –  user2066880 Sep 4 '13 at 6:45
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