Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need two regex regular expressions. One that will find the second block of numbers and one that will find the third block of numbers. My data is like this:

8782910291827182    04  1988    081

One code to find the 04 and other to find the 1988. I already have the expression to find the first 16 numbers and the last 3 numbers, but I am stuck in finding those 2 numbers of the second and third section.

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Jan Dvorak, Jerry, bensiu, Anand, OneOfOne Sep 4 '13 at 13:29

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Why don't you extract all the numbers in one go? Something like this? –  Jerry Sep 4 '13 at 4:59
2  
"I already have the expression to find the first 16 numbers and the last 3 numbers but I am stuck in finding those 2 numbers of the second and third section." -- can we see it? saying that you tried does not count as a proof of effort –  Jan Dvorak Sep 4 '13 at 5:00

2 Answers 2

Use Field-Splitting Instead

Based on your corpus, it seems that one should be able to rely on the existence of four fields separated by tabs or other whitespace. Splitting fields is much easier than building and testing a regex, so I'd recommend skipping the regex unless there are edge cases not included in your examples.

Consider the following Ruby examples:

# Split the string into fields.
string = '8782910291827182    04  1988    081'
fields = string.split /\s+/
#=> ["8782910291827182", "04", "1988", "081"]

# Access members of the field array.
fields.first
#=> "8782910291827182"

fields[1]
#=> "04"

fields[2]
#=> "1988"

# Unpack array elements into variables.
field1, field2, field3, field4 = fields
p field2, field3
#=> ["04", "1988"]

A regular expression will force you to spend more time on pattern matching, especially as your corpus grows more complex; string-splitting is generally simpler, and will enable to you focus more on the result set. In most cases, the end results will be functionally similar, so which one is more useful to you will depend on what you're really trying to do. It's always good to have alternative options!

share|improve this answer

Find 2 numbers:

\b\d{2}\b

Find 4 numbers:

\b\d{4}\b
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.