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I want to swap two variables values without using the third variable in Perl, e. g.:

my $first = 10;
my $second = 20;

Please suggest me how we can do this in Perl in a simple way.

share|improve this question
    
($first, $second)=($second, $first); This is technically cheating your rules since it does create an anonymous array... – abiessu Sep 4 '13 at 5:45
6  
@abiessu: Nope, no anonymous array. (They're just lists; for an anonymous array, you'd use [...] to get an arrayref.) And even if there were an anonymous array, I don't think I'd count it as a "third variable". – ruakh Sep 4 '13 at 5:49
up vote 14 down vote accepted

The best way that only provide us is like this in one line you can swap the values:

 ($first, $second) = ($second, $first);
share|improve this answer
    
This is working fine for me.. – user2568702 Sep 4 '13 at 5:48
    
Yup but i will suggest u to dis in a proper manner.I am updating my answer – Developer Sep 4 '13 at 5:49
2  
Your version with my technically isn't swapping the values of existing variables, but rather creating new variables whose names shadow the existing ones. – ruakh Sep 4 '13 at 5:51
2  
Why do you say that your second version is the best way to do it? The second version is really obscure. Your first version is much clearer. I'd use that every time. – Dave Cross Sep 4 '13 at 10:18
2  
The question said "in Perl". Your first answer is clearly the best way to do it in Perl. – Dave Cross Sep 4 '13 at 10:31

You can write:

($first, $second) = ($second, $first);

(See §3.4 "List Assignment" in Learning Perl, Third Edition.)

share|improve this answer
1  
We're up to the sixth edition of Learning Perl now :) – brian d foy May 19 '15 at 15:51
1  
Are you saying people weren't really paying attention to the first five? Because from the look of the other answers... ;-) – T.Rob May 19 '15 at 17:32

The Perl-specific methods already listed are best, but here's a technique using XOR that works in many languages, including Perl:

use strict;

my $x = 4;
my $y = 8;

print "X: $x  Y: $y\n";

$x ^= $y;
$y ^= $x;
$x ^= $y;

print "X: $x  Y: $y\n";

X: 4  Y: 8
X: 8  Y: 4
share|improve this answer
4  
This won't work in Perl since the ^ operator has slightly different semantics in string and number forms. Change one of your values to a non-numeric string and you'll see the problem. – brian d foy May 19 '15 at 15:45
    
...and it won't work if $x == $y, at least if they're numeric. – Jan Nov 13 '15 at 6:34

You can do this relatively easy using simple maths.

We know;

First = 10
Second = 20

If we say First = First + Second

We now have the following;

First = 30
Second = 20

Now you can say Second = First - Second (Second = 30 - 20)

We now have;

First = 30
Second = 10

Now minus Second from First, and you get First = 20, and Second = 10.

share|improve this answer
3  
Far too complicated. Why not just ($first, $second) = ($second, $first)? – Dave Cross Sep 4 '13 at 10:19
2  
Not only is it complicated, it's broken. This answer should be deleted. – brian d foy May 19 '15 at 15:51
$first = $first + $second;
$second = $first - $second;
$first = $first-$second;

This will swap two integer variables A better solution might be

$first = $first xor $second;
$second = $first xor $second;
$first = $first xor $second;
share|improve this answer
1  
This also assumes that the variables contain data that is addable/subtractible like numbers. – abiessu Sep 4 '13 at 5:53
3  
Re: "This will swap two integer variables in any programming language": That's a bit too broad, I think. Even if we restrict consideration to languages that allow you to assign new values to existing variables, this won't work for all integer values in languages where integer overflow isn't well-defined. (For example, in C this code is dangerous.) – ruakh Sep 4 '13 at 5:54
2  
Far too complicated. Why not just ($first, $second) = ($second, $first)? – Dave Cross Sep 4 '13 at 10:19
2  
You can see it's far too complicated just by looking at it. It takes three statements where the list assignment only takes one. The list assignment shows exactly what is happening (two variables are swapping their values) whereas in your version the main point of the process only happens as a side-effect of some arithmetic. Ask yourself whether a random programmer would be able to understand what's going on from just looking at your code. And finally, your code doesn't even solve the whole problem. The question just mentioned "variable values". Your solution only works for numbers. – Dave Cross Sep 4 '13 at 13:17
2  
This won't work since you'll destroy the non-numeric string value of a scalar. It also will possibly change floating point values. – brian d foy May 19 '15 at 15:48
#!/usr/bin/perl

$a=5;
$b=6;

print "\n The value of a and b before swap is --> $a,$b \n";

$a=$a+$b;
$b=$a-$b;
$a=$a-$b;

print "\n The value of a and b after swap is as follows:";
print "\n The value of a is ---->$a \n";
print "\n The value of b is----->$b \n";
share|improve this answer
2  
This won't work since you'll destroy the non-numeric string value of a scalar. It also will possibly change floating point values. – brian d foy May 19 '15 at 15:47

you can use this logic

firstValue = firstValue + secondValue;

secondValue = firstValue - secondValue;

firstValue = firstValue - secondValue;
share|improve this answer
    
Far too complicated. Why not just ($first, $second) = ($second, $first)? – Dave Cross Sep 4 '13 at 10:30
1  
This won't work since you'll destroy the non-numeric string value of a scalar. It also will possibly change floating point values. – brian d foy May 19 '15 at 15:47

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