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I have two for loops in my code running the same number of loop cycles. These two loops are independent (each loop works on different input data). Within one loop, there are CPU functions and several kernels not running concurrently.

Can I run these iterations on separate GPUs?

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What do you mean by "iterations"? Do you mean "loops"? for loops, while loops? Do the two "iterations" have the same number of cycles? If the "iterations" are running on different data and are independent, then I believe that you can run the involved kernels separately on two different GPUs. However, I think that you have to take care about synchronization of the CPU processings on the partial outcomes of the two GPUs. Due to this, I think you will not experience the maximum possible speedup factor of 2. –  JackOLantern Sep 4 '13 at 7:13
    
Yes, these iterations are called in for loop. And iterations have same number of cycles and completely independent(separate input and output). I have one more doubt. Do I need to create streams? I think it must work fine without streams. –  Gaurav Sep 4 '13 at 7:19
    
Starting with CUDA 4.0, you can use cudaSetDevice() to set the current context corresponding to a given device. Of course, you can create streams within each context to enable concurrent executions of kernels on the same GPU, but I think it is not what you are looking for. –  JackOLantern Sep 4 '13 at 7:26
    
Thanks, now its clear what I need to do. –  Gaurav Sep 4 '13 at 7:30

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can run the involved kernels separately on two different GPUs.

You have to take care about synchronization of the CPU processings on the partial outcomes of the two GPUs. Due to the presence of a sequential part, you will perhaps not experience the maximum possible speedup factor of 2 when working with 2 GPUs.

Starting with CUDA 4.0, you can use cudaSetDevice() to set the current context corresponding to a given device without the need of creating streams to enable multi-gpu processing.

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