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I am creating a mechanism which allows users to form arbitrary complex functions from basic building blocks using the decorator pattern. This works fine functionality wise, but I don't like the fact that it involves a lot of virtual calls, particularly when the nesting depth becomes large. It worries me because the complex function may called often (>100.000 times).

To avoid this problem, I tried to turn the decorator scheme into a std::function once it was finished (cfr. to_function() in the SSCCE). All internal function calls are wired during construction of the std::function. I figured this would be faster to evaluate than the original decorator scheme because no virtual lookups need to be performed in the std::function version.

Alas, benchmarks prove me wrong: the decorator scheme is in fact faster than the std::function I built from it. So now I am left wondering why. Maybe my test setup is faulty since I only use two trivial basic functions, which means the vtable lookups may be cached?

The code I used is included below, unfortunately it is quite long.


SSCCE

// sscce.cpp
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <memory>
#include <functional>
#include <random>

/**
 * Base class for Pipeline scheme (implemented via decorators)
 */
class Pipeline {
protected:
    std::unique_ptr<Pipeline> wrappee;
    Pipeline(std::unique_ptr<Pipeline> wrap)
    :wrappee(std::move(wrap)){}
    Pipeline():wrappee(nullptr){}

public:
    typedef std::function<double(double)> FnSig;
    double operator()(double input) const{
        if(wrappee.get()) input=wrappee->operator()(input);
        return process(input);
    }

    virtual double process(double input) const=0;
    virtual ~Pipeline(){}

    // Returns a std::function which contains the entire Pipeline stack.
    virtual FnSig to_function() const=0;
};

/**
 * CRTP for to_function().
 */
template <class Derived>
class Pipeline_CRTP : public Pipeline{
protected:
    Pipeline_CRTP(const Pipeline_CRTP<Derived> &o):Pipeline(o){}
    Pipeline_CRTP(std::unique_ptr<Pipeline> wrappee)
    :Pipeline(std::move(wrappee)){}
    Pipeline_CRTP():Pipeline(){};
public:
    typedef typename Pipeline::FnSig FnSig;

    FnSig to_function() const override{
        if(Pipeline::wrappee.get()!=nullptr){

            FnSig wrapfun = Pipeline::wrappee->to_function();
            FnSig processfun = std::bind(&Derived::process,
                static_cast<const Derived*>(this),
                std::placeholders::_1);
            FnSig fun = [=](double input){
                return processfun(wrapfun(input));
            };
            return std::move(fun);

        }else{

            FnSig processfun = std::bind(&Derived::process,
                static_cast<const Derived*>(this),
                std::placeholders::_1);
            FnSig fun = [=](double input){
                return processfun(input);
            };
            return std::move(fun);
        }

    }

    virtual ~Pipeline_CRTP(){}
};

/**
 * First concrete derived class: simple scaling.
 */
class Scale: public Pipeline_CRTP<Scale>{
private:
    double scale_;
public:
    Scale(std::unique_ptr<Pipeline> wrap, double scale) // todo move
:Pipeline_CRTP<Scale>(std::move(wrap)),scale_(scale){}
    Scale(double scale):Pipeline_CRTP<Scale>(),scale_(scale){}

    double process(double input) const override{
        return input*scale_;
    }
};

/**
 * Second concrete derived class: offset.
 */
class Offset: public Pipeline_CRTP<Offset>{
private:
    double offset_;
public:
    Offset(std::unique_ptr<Pipeline> wrap, double offset) // todo move
:Pipeline_CRTP<Offset>(std::move(wrap)),offset_(offset){}
    Offset(double offset):Pipeline_CRTP<Offset>(),offset_(offset){}

    double process(double input) const override{
        return input+offset_;
    }
};

int main(){

    // used to make a random function / arguments
    // to prevent gcc from being overly clever
    std::default_random_engine generator;
    auto randint = std::bind(std::uniform_int_distribution<int>(0,1),std::ref(generator));
    auto randdouble = std::bind(std::normal_distribution<double>(0.0,1.0),std::ref(generator));

    // make a complex Pipeline
    std::unique_ptr<Pipeline> pipe(new Scale(randdouble()));
    for(unsigned i=0;i<100;++i){
        if(randint()) pipe=std::move(std::unique_ptr<Pipeline>(new Scale(std::move(pipe),randdouble())));
        else pipe=std::move(std::unique_ptr<Pipeline>(new Offset(std::move(pipe),randdouble())));
    }

    // make a std::function from pipe
    Pipeline::FnSig fun(pipe->to_function());   

    double bla=0.0;
    for(unsigned i=0; i<100000; ++i){
#ifdef USE_FUNCTION
        // takes 110 ms on average
        bla+=fun(bla);
#else
        // takes 60 ms on average
        bla+=pipe->operator()(bla);
#endif
    }   
    std::cout << bla << std::endl;
}

Benchmark

Using pipe:

g++ -std=gnu++11 sscce.cpp -march=native -O3
sudo nice -3 /usr/bin/time ./a.out
-> 60 ms

Using fun:

g++ -DUSE_FUNCTION -std=gnu++11 sscce.cpp -march=native -O3
sudo nice -3 /usr/bin/time ./a.out
-> 110 ms
share|improve this question
11  
std::function is full of virtual lookups... – Kerrek SB Sep 4 '13 at 8:29
4  
I would suggest you time the actual code, in code, instead of using the time command. Then do that many times, and average the times. Also, will the possible extra time really matter in the long run? – Joachim Pileborg Sep 4 '13 at 8:36
2  
You're comparing 60ms and 110ms and think this is significant? – stefan Sep 4 '13 at 8:50
3  
@MarcClaesen: How do you think std::function works? Since it can store any callable object, it must use some kind of dynamicism. – Kerrek SB Sep 4 '13 at 8:54
8  
@MarcClaesen I'm always sceptical about comparisons on run time in the range of a few milliseconds. But I reproduced your test with a longer loop and it confirms your measurements roughly (in fact on my machine it's more than twice as bad). – stefan Sep 4 '13 at 9:00
up vote 17 down vote accepted

As Sebastian Redl's answer says, your "alternative" to virtual functions adds several layers of indirection through dynamically bound functions (either virtual, or through function pointers, depending on the std::function implementation) and then it still calls the virtual Pipeline::process(double) function anyway!

This modification makes it significantly faster, by removing one layer of std::function indirection and preventing the call to Derived::process being virtual:

FnSig to_function() const override {
    FnSig fun;
    auto derived_this = static_cast<const Derived*>(this);
    if (Pipeline::wrappee) {
        FnSig wrapfun = Pipeline::wrappee->to_function();
        fun = [=](double input){
            return derived_this->Derived::process(wrapfun(input));
        };
    } else {
        fun = [=](double input){
            return derived_this->Derived::process(input);
        };
    }
    return fun;
}

There's still more work being done here than in the virtual function version though.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your improvement, it did indeed yield a significant speedup. I am wondering, though, why std::bind(&Derived::process,static_cast<const Derived*>(this),std::placeholders::_1); results in a virtual call? Doesn't the cast to the correct derived class (in which process is no longer virtual) circumvent the virtual call? – Marc Claesen Sep 4 '13 at 12:24
1  
No, &Derived::process is still a pointer to a virtual function, any call through it is a virtual call. All you've cast is this, you haven't prevented calls through &Derived::process being virtual. – Jonathan Wakely Sep 4 '13 at 12:31
    
I see, thanks for all the information! I thought the result of the bind would be equivalent with your version, but this just goes to show that I have lots to learn :-) – Marc Claesen Sep 4 '13 at 12:34
1  
To put it another way, the cast is equivalent to doing static_cast<Derived*>(this)->process(input) instead of this->process(input) i.e. it has no effect at all! – Jonathan Wakely Sep 4 '13 at 12:39

You have std::functions binding lambdas that call std::functions that bind lamdbas that call std::functions that ...

Look at your to_function. It creates a lambda that calls two std::functions, and returns that lambda bound into another std::function. The compiler won't resolve any of these statically.

So in the end, you end with with just as many indirect calls as the virtual function solution, and that's if you get rid of the bound processfun and directly call it in the lambda. Otherwise you have twice as many.

If you want a speedup, you will have to create the entire pipeline in a way that can be statically resolved, and that means a lot more templates before you can finally erase the type into a single std::function.

share|improve this answer

std::function is notoriously slow; type erasure and the resulting allocation play a part in this, also, with gcc, invocations are inlined/optimized badly. For this reason there exist a plethora of C++ "delegates" with which people attempt to resolve this problem. I ported one to Code Review:

http://codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/14730/impossibly-fast-delegate-in-c11

But you can find plenty of others with Google, or write your own.

share|improve this answer
    
Excelent contribution. I was benchmarking the Man or Boy test with Objective-C (blocks) and C++ (lambdas) and C++ was really, really slow thanks to std::function. It got perfect with your code. ;) – Paulo Torrens Jul 7 '15 at 11:38

libstdc++ implementation of std::function works roughly as follows:

template<typename Signature>
struct Function
{
    Ptr functor;
    Ptr functor_manager;

    template<class Functor>
    Function(const Functor& f)
    {
        functor_manager = &FunctorManager<Functor>::manage;
        functor = new Functor(f);
    }

    Function(const Function& that)
    {
        functor = functor_manager(CLONE, that->functor);
    }

    R operator()(args) // Signature
    {
        return functor_manager(INVOKE, functor, args);
    }

    ~Function()
    {
        functor_manager(DESTROY, functor);
    }
}

template<class Functor>
struct FunctorManager
{
     static manage(int operation, Functor& f)
     {
         switch (operation)
         {
         case CLONE: call Functor copy constructor;
         case INVOKE: call Functor::operator();
         case DESTROY: call Functor destructor;
         }
     }
}

So although std::function doesn't know the exact type of the Functor object, it dispatches the important operations through a functor_manager function pointer that is a static function of a template instance that does know about the Functor type.

Each std::function instance will allocate on the heap its own owned copy of the functor object (unless it is not larger than a pointer, such as a function pointer, in which case it just holds the pointer as a subobject).

The important take away is that copying of std::function is expensive if the underlying functor object has an expensive copy constructor and/or takes lots of space (for example to hold bound parameters).

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't know which implementation you're referring to but neither boost::function nor GCC's std::function uses virtual functions. Some implementations might, but not all. – Jonathan Wakely Sep 4 '13 at 11:46
1  
@JonathanWakely: Thanks, I misremembered completely - I have corrected my answer with an overview of the libstdc++ std::function architecture. – Andrew Tomazos Sep 4 '13 at 14:38
    
@JonathanWakely: Interestingly the FunctionManager<Functor> object serves a purpose not unlike a vtable. I'd be interested to know how much slower using virtual functions would have been. – Andrew Tomazos Sep 4 '13 at 15:46

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