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This is one of the class definitions within a DLL I use in my WCF service.

[DataContract]
public class ScenarioXML
{
    [DataMember(Order = 1)]
    public long? TNRScenario { get; set; }
    [DataMember(Order = 2)]
    public long? TNRProject { get; set; }
    [DataMember(Order = 3)]
    public int? Priority { get; set; }        
    // ...
    [DataMember(Order = 19)]
    public List<ScenarioAssetXML> ScenarioAssets { get; set; }
    [DataMember(Order = 20)]
    public List<CalendarXML> Calendars { get; set; }
    [DataMember(Order = 21)]
    public ScenarioTriggerCollectionXML ScenarioTriggerCollection { get; set; }
}

I'm using DataContract instead of ProtoContract, so I can expose this class to a Silverlight project through a WSDL, and still use Protobuf-net for serialization.

Now, when I use the following code in my WCF service, the original "scenario" and the "restoredModel" are identical.

MemoryStream msTestString = new MemoryStream();
Serializer.Serialize<ScenarioXML>(msTestString, scenario);
string memento = Convert.ToBase64String(msTestString.ToArray());

byte[] byteAfter64 = Convert.FromBase64String(memento);
MemoryStream afterStream = new MemoryStream(byteAfter64);
ScenarioXML restoredModel = Serializer.Deserialize<ScenarioXML>(afterStream);

However, when I use the same code in Silverlight, the TNRScenario value is null. Similarly, the TNRScenarioAsset property of the objects in the ScenarioAssets list are null.

[DataContract]
public class ScenarioAssetXML
{
    [DataMember(Order = 1)]
    public long? TNRScenarioAsset { get; set; }
    [DataMember(Order = 2)]
    public long? TNRScenario { get; set; }
    [DataMember(Order = 3)]
    public string Asset { get; set; }
    [DataMember(Order = 4)]
    public string Action { get; set; }
}

When I make the first property a string, it completely vanishes after (de)serialization. When I put a dummy bool as a first property, the bool is there, but the second property, in this case ScenarioAssets, is still null. There's something weird going on here...

Am I doing somethign wrong, or is this a bug?

Edit: You're right Marc! The orders get messed up in the WSDL-generated code.

[System.Diagnostics.DebuggerStepThroughAttribute()]
[System.CodeDom.Compiler.GeneratedCodeAttribute("System.Runtime.Serialization", "4.0.0.0")]
[System.Runtime.Serialization.DataContractAttribute(Name="ScenarioXML", Namespace="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/DataCollectionDLL")]
public partial class ScenarioXML : object, System.ComponentModel.INotifyPropertyChanged {

    private System.Nullable<long> TNRScenarioField;

    private System.Nullable<long> TNRProjectField;

    private System.Nullable<int> PriorityField;

    //...

    [System.Runtime.Serialization.DataMemberAttribute()]
    public System.Nullable<long> TNRScenario {
        get {
            return this.TNRScenarioField;
        }
        set {
            if ((this.TNRScenarioField.Equals(value) != true)) {
                this.TNRScenarioField = value;
                this.RaisePropertyChanged("TNRScenario");
            }
        }
    }

    [System.Runtime.Serialization.DataMemberAttribute(Order=1)]
    public System.Nullable<long> TNRProject {
        get {
            return this.TNRProjectField;
        }
        set {
            if ((this.TNRProjectField.Equals(value) != true)) {
                this.TNRProjectField = value;
                this.RaisePropertyChanged("TNRProject");
            }
        }
    }

    [System.Runtime.Serialization.DataMemberAttribute(Order=2)]
    public System.Nullable<int> Priority {
        get {
            return this.PriorityField;
        }
        set {
            if ((this.PriorityField.Equals(value) != true)) {
                this.PriorityField = value;
                this.RaisePropertyChanged("Priority");
            }
        }
    }
    //...

However, I'm not sure how to correctly implement that partial class? I created it in the WCF service, but that seems to confuse the compiler. Getting the following errors:

  • Error 6 'DataCollectionDLL.ScenarioXML' does not contain a definition for 'TNRScenario' and no extension method 'TNRScenario' accepting a first argument of type 'DataCollectionDLL.ScenarioXML' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?)
  • Error 2 Cannot convert type 'DataCollectionDLL.ScenarioXML [c:\Projects\Flowcontrol 1.7.1.1\flowcontrolFC.Web\Libraries\DataCollectionDLL.dll]' to 'DataCollectionDLL.ScenarioXML [C:\Projects\Flowcontrol 1.7.1.1\flowcontrolFC.Web\DAL\DataCollectionClasses\ScenarioXML.cs(31)]'

Then tried it in the Silverlight project, which compiles fine but that doesn't solve the problem. Results are the same.

The partial class I created:

namespace DataCollectionDLL
{
    [ProtoContract]
    [ProtoPartialMember(1, "TNRScenario")]
    [ProtoPartialMember(2, "TNRProject")]
    [ProtoPartialMember(3, "Priority")]
    //...
    [ProtoPartialMember(21, "ScenarioTriggerCollection")]
    partial class ScenarioXML
    {
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
The partial class file needs to go in the same project as the .designer.cs - is that the case? also - if they are all just of by one, there's a way to simplify that –  Marc Gravell Sep 4 '13 at 13:31
    
Which .designer.cs file do you mean...? I've got a bunch of .designer.cs files in my project folder, but they're all just related to resource files... I don't know which .designer.cs file would have anything to do with the WSDL-generated code? The ScenarioXML class definition I posted above is hidden away in some 'reference.cs' file under 'Service References'. –  user2746027 Sep 4 '13 at 15:23
    
bump? ........... –  user2746027 Sep 8 '13 at 14:27

1 Answer 1

It sounds like you used WSDL-generated proxies; that can confuse things a little bit, because protobuf-net really really cares what the numbers are, and WSDL can sometimes play fast and loose with those. It would really help if I could see the WSDL-generated proxy classes (in the .designer.cs), but I'm going to assume this is the problem. Fortunately, most code-generators use partial class, so you can add your own partial class in a separate file to add extra information into the same type, in particular: more attributes. For example:

namespace The.Same.Namespace
{
    [ProtoContract]
    [ProtoPartialMember(1, "TNRScenario")]
    [ProtoPartialMember(2, "TNRProject")]
    // ...
    [ProtoPartialMember(21, "ScenarioTriggerCollection")]
    partial class ScenarioXML { }
}

This will get merged by the compiler into the ScenarioXML class, and should allow protobuf-net to use the correct numeric identifiers for each property.

share|improve this answer
    
Puyting my reply in the original post... not enough characters ;) –  user2746027 Sep 4 '13 at 13:10

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