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Lets say i have the following list:

List<MyObject> myObjectsList = new ArrayList<>();

if i do something like this:

synchronized(myObjectsList )
{
  //some code runs here...
}

does it mean that every object inside the list is thread safe or if some other thread has a reference to some of the objects inside the list can modify it?

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... or if some other thread has a reference to some of the objects inside the list can modify it?

Yes, they can modify the objects as they can acquire lock on your MyObject instances.

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So if i want the objects inside the list to be thread safe i need to lock every one of them while iterating through the list and working with the objects, right? – Joro Seksa Sep 4 '13 at 10:06
1  
@JoroSeksa if you make sure that the objects can be gotten only via the arraylist.get(), then the code in your post is OK. – Juvanis Sep 4 '13 at 10:08
1  
Three possibilities: (1) If the objects contained in the list are inherently thread-safe (e.g. immutable) you are ok. (2) Have individual locks for every object in the list (e.g. synchronize on the object itself whenever accessing it) (3) Use a global lock whenever you access such an object (e.g always synchronize on the list, even if accessing a reference previously aquired from the list). – Pyranja Sep 4 '13 at 10:09
    
10x @Pyranja. That is what i was looking for:) – Joro Seksa Sep 4 '13 at 10:13
synchronized(myObjectsList )
{
  //some code runs here...
}

What this code does is only acquiring a unique lock on the list. That is literally everything it does. So this does not prevent other code from doing anything in your list. Literally everything can be done. However, when your other concurrent code is also trying to acquire a lock on it (ie: it is also surrounded by a synchronized statement on the same myObjectsList), it will block until the lock is released by the synchronized block that owned the lock.

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