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I have a base class that inherits from Form, that registers a event handler on Shown:

class BaseClass : Form {
    public BaseClass() : base() {
        Shown += new EventHandler(BaseClass_Shown);
    }
    void BaseClass_Shown(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        Close();
        MessageBox.Show("This cannot be opened.");
    }
}

Now, when I subclass this Form and open it in the designer, I actually get that messsage and it closes the form in the designer making is impossible for me to visually edit it.

Is there perhaps some boolean I can use to prevent the Close() and MessageBox to happen?

(Little background: the Close is not always called, but depends on some runtime settings and data)

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1  
Have you tried with DesignMode property of Form? (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) –  Alessandro D'Andria Sep 4 '13 at 10:10
1  
@AlessandroD'Andria I have now. That is exactly what I was looking for. Please make it an answer, so I can accept. –  Bart Friederichs Sep 4 '13 at 10:14
    
Don't worry, but be careful because sometimes DebugMode not working properly. –  Alessandro D'Andria Sep 4 '13 at 10:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Some events are fired in the designer as well, it is what gives the Winforms designer its wysiwyg ability. Notably Paint, Shown is also fired, etcetera. The DesignMode property is provided to allow you to tell whether your event handler is running at design-time. Fix:

void BaseClass_Shown(object sender, EventArgs e) {
    if (!this.DesignMode) {
        Close();
        MessageBox.Show("This cannot be opened.");
    }
}

Do note the flaw in your approach, this event also fires for a derived form. You might be helping too much.

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I want it to fire for the derived form. This is the base for a "module" and I only want these modules to show if a certain setting is set. –  Bart Friederichs Sep 4 '13 at 10:34
    
You remind a programmer that he's doing it wrong with an exception, not a message box. This should be reported with an InvalidOperationException. –  Hans Passant Sep 4 '13 at 11:16
    
It's not a programmer's message, but a user message. The user has to make a choice first. –  Bart Friederichs Sep 4 '13 at 11:19
    
Create an intuitive user interface by disabling invalid choices. Easy to do with the Enabled property. A "You did it WRONG!" message box is grating. –  Hans Passant Sep 4 '13 at 11:25
    
I agree and I could do it like that, but disabling the menu choice doesn't give you any clue on why it is disabled. A message box does. The message is not "you cannot open", it is "you cannot open because you didn't set foo, please set foo in foomenu->foosettings". This has to be done only once in the application, not every time you run it. The choice is stored in the application. –  Bart Friederichs Sep 4 '13 at 11:28

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