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I'm trying to pass an STL container as a template parameter. In this case, the vector.

Here is my not-functional code:

template<template<class> class TContainer, class TObject>
class Foobar
{
public:

    explicit Foobar( TContainer<TObject*> & container )
    :
    container_( container ){}


private:

    TContainer<TObject*> & container_;
};


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::vector<IUnknown*> v;

    Foobar<std::vector, IUnknown*> bla( v );

    return 0;
}

Is this, what I'm trying to do possible at all, because the compiler cannot swallow this?

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Joachim Pileborg, Tom Tanner, Mario, Roman C, zsong Sep 4 '13 at 22:17

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
@itwasntpete, very helpful, thank you. –  moose Sep 4 '13 at 12:29
    
my first comment was a joke... but in your code are quite a lot of problems. also passing an type (int) and a specified template class (vector<IUnknown*>) is also a design issue. you could start like here. –  user1810087 Sep 4 '13 at 12:50
    
pleas explain why it's not functional and what you expect it to do? –  Tom Tanner Sep 4 '13 at 13:43
    
Adding to Tom's comment, please show at least the first compiler error. There's a vote to close this, but I think if you show that error and ask about it in particular then the question will be left open. –  Codie CodeMonkey Sep 4 '13 at 21:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are several things wrong with your code, here is a working example:

template<template<class, class> class TContainer, class TObject>
class Foobar
{
public:
    explicit Foobar( TContainer<TObject*, std::allocator<TObject*>> & container )
    :
    container_( container ){}

private:
    TContainer<TObject*, std::allocator<TObject*>> & container_;
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<IUnknown*> v;
    Foobar<std::vector, IUnknown> bla( v );
}

The main fault of your codes it that std::vector takes two template arguments. It looks like this template<class T, class Allocator = std::allocator<T>> class vector;. Also, Joachim Pileborg is right about the double pointer issue, IUnknown**. However, you could simplify your code with the following:

template<class TContainer>
class Foobar
{
public:
    explicit Foobar( TContainer & container )
    :
    container_( container ){}

private:
    TContainer & container_; // Be careful with reference members
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<IUnknown*> v;
    Foobar<std::vector<IUnknown*>> bla( v ); // C++11 decltype(v) could be used
}
share|improve this answer
    
Regarding simplified version, how do you know what type is in the vector? (Suppose you want to use for_each on 'container_' inside Foobar.) –  moose Sep 4 '13 at 13:15
    
@moose: typename TContainer::value_type would give you the type in the vector. Im not sure why you would need that with for_each though. –  Jesse Good Sep 4 '13 at 13:53
    
if I use lambda function with for_each, I would need the 'TContainer::value_type' as lambda argument. –  moose Sep 4 '13 at 14:40

There are three different kinds of template arguments: values, types, and templates:

template <int value_argument> class C { };
template <class type_argument> class D { };
template <template<classT> class template_argument> class E { };

When you use these templates you have to provide an argument of the correct kind:

C<3> c;
D<int> d;
E<C> e;

When you use the third form, a template template argument, the template passed as the argument must match the declaration of the template template argument. In my simple examples, the template E expects a template template argument that takes one type argument.

In the code in the question, the first argument in the declaration of Foobar is template <class> class TContainer. At the point where it's used, the template that's passed is std::vector:

Foobar<std::vector, IUnknown*> bla(v);

The problem is that the template template argument says that it should have one argument, but the template that's passed as the actual argument has two or more. Formally, std::vector is

template <class T, class Allocator = std::allocator<T>> class vector { ... };

In order to use std::vector> as the first argument toFoobar, the definition ofFoobar` needs to be changed so that the first argument takes two type arguments:

template <template<class, class> TContainer, class TObject> class Foobar { ... };
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the explanation, but the main problem in this case is that the first argument to Foobar is a template with the wrong number of arguments (2 instead of the expected 1). –  juanchopanza Sep 4 '13 at 13:05
    
@juanchopanza - gack. You're right. Revising... –  Pete Becker Sep 4 '13 at 13:06

Another possibility is to make TContainer a variadic template:

#include <vector>

struct TObject {};
struct IUnknown {};

template<template<class...> class TContainer, class TObject>
class Foobar
{
public:
    explicit Foobar( TContainer<TObject*> & container ) : container_( container ){}
private:
    TContainer<TObject*> & container_;
};

int main() {
    std::vector<IUnknown*> v;
    Foobar<std::vector, IUnknown> bla( v );
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
VS2010 cannot compile that. It seems like '<class...>' is the problem. –  moose Sep 4 '13 at 12:56
    
@moose Yeah, VS doesn't support variadics yet. Should work in VS 2013 though. –  catscradle Sep 4 '13 at 12:59

You may create a synonym of your vector type with typedef to simplify coding.

typedef vector<MyClass> List;

Then use List as a template parameter as an "ordinary" type.

template<class T, class K>
class Foobar {...}

Foobar<List> variable;
share|improve this answer

To start with, you probably get some compiler errors, if so you should have added them to the question as right now we can only guess.

Secondly, I'm guessing that it's because of your template parameter:

Foobar<std::vector, IUnknown*> bla( v );
//                  ^^^^^^^^^

Here you tell the compiler that the template parameter is a pointer, but then you have the constructor:

Foobar( TContainer<TObject*> & container )
//                 ^^^^^^^^

In the constructor you declare container to be a TContainer with TObject* members, but since TObject already is a pointer you now have a pointer-to-pointer. If TObject equals IUnknown* then TObject* equals IUnknown**. You have the same problem when declaring the container_ member variable.

I recommend you drop the pointer-type when declaring bla:

Foobar<std::vector, IUnknown> bla( v );
//                  ^^^^^^^^
share|improve this answer
    
AFAIK, according to my code above, TObject = IUnknown*. –  moose Sep 4 '13 at 12:33
    
@moose Yes, and the you add another asterisk to TObject making TObject* the same as IUnknown**. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 4 '13 at 12:34
    
I'm sorry, but you are wrong. –  moose Sep 4 '13 at 12:37
    
@moose Then edit your question to include the actual errors! Otherwise we will just be stumbling in the dark and guess wildly. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 4 '13 at 12:39

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