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I am trying to perform a simple Date query on Google App Engine using the Search API. All I am trying to achieve is to obtain a list of all Documents that have a Field equal to a certain Date...

// Prepare the Query
String searchString = "date = 2013-08-26";
Query query = Query.newBuilder().build(searchString);

// Get the Date_Search Index
IndexSpec indexSpec = IndexSpec.newBuilder().setName("Date_Search").build();
Index index = SearchServiceFactory.getSearchService().getIndex(indexSpec);

// Perform the search
Results<ScoredDocument> results = index.search(query);

When I run the above code, no results are returned. However, if I change the query to be date >= 2013-08-26 && date < 2013-08-27 instead, the expected results are returned. It seems as though the date equality logic isn't working.

This is the list of Documents in my Index...

DocId                                   OrderId     date        event_key
3d4e5691-8fb9-42de-bf09-f2303236f091    84288787    2013-08-25  641.0
7e4700fe-dee1-4579-87c5-69b1b1929f39    84288787    2013-08-25  650.0
8c9ca43d-7673-4f12-9f0b-e3328cbdaa85    84288787    2013-08-26  659.0
04fa8025-e01b-42d3-9bf9-21c3d9618ca7    84288787    2013-08-26  668.0
41465d1f-6d8a-431f-b226-141c8d72c064    84288787    2013-08-26  676.0
1ba01a6b-0890-43b3-8225-0ed196b6ee80    84288787    2013-08-27  676.0
a8ef18b1-ffa5-4823-8442-852f7142cad1    84288786    2013-08-25  633.0

I would be expecting that 3 documents would be returned for the date 2013-08-26. When running with the equality date = 2013-08-26 there are no results, but the query date >= 2013-08-26 && date < 2013-08-27 returns the expected 3 results.

The Documents were added to the Index using the following code...

// Build the Date
Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
Date dateObject = calendar.getTime();

// Create the Document
Builder builder = Document.newBuilder();
builder.addField(Field.newBuilder().setName("event_key").setNumber(eventKey));
builder.addField(Field.newBuilder().setName("date").setDate(dateObject));
Document document = builder.build();

// Get the Date_Search Index
IndexSpec indexSpec = IndexSpec.newBuilder().setName("Date_Search").build();
Index index = SearchServiceFactory.getSearchService().getIndex(indexSpec);

// Store the Document
index.put(document);

According to the Search API Documentation, Date fields are stored and are query-able only to YYYY-MM-DD precision(the Time information is stripped out when storing and querying). Additionally, the Query on Date Fields Documentation shows that date equality queries are supported.

Could someone please help me to understand what the issue is.

share|improve this question

Your use of Search for dates is correct. There were bugs in this area, but they have been fixed in version 1.8.4.

A couple of points of clarification:

  1. Dates are stored at millisecond resolution, but they're indexed at a resolution of one day. So, for purposes of searching and sorting we have only the date, not the time of day. But when you actually examine a retrieved document, any Date fields will have been restored to their millisecond precision.

  2. Dates that appear in a query (in YYYY-MM-DD form) are considered in the UTC time zone. The implication of this is a bit subtle:

    Let's say you're sitting in Australia at 2:00am on 2013/9/10, and you decide to insert a document with the then-current time. Over in Greenwich it's not yet midnight; the date is still September 9. If you search for the document by date, you would find it with [date=2013/09/09] but not with [date=2013/09/10].

    Similarly, if you're sitting in California at 9:00pm one night, it's already past midnight in UTC ...

  3. There seems to be a bug in the dev server admin console. On the Full Text Search page, if you display document content that includes a date, the date is rendered in the local time zone instead of UTC. And it also does not include the time component.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply Alan. I have only tried this on the Development server currently, as I am still in the process of completing the code for Production. I am running the latest SDK - 1.8.4 - and the issue is still occurring. I have added this information to Issues 9353 and 8076, which both seem similar. – WATTO Studios Sep 7 '13 at 3:57
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This issue has been resolved in SDK 1.8.4.

Please take note that upgrading to 1.8.4 caused my development datastore to become invalid, as Google are allowed to do if required. Once I recreated the data in the 1.8.4 datastore, the Search API worked correctly for the equality Date Search.

share|improve this answer

Looks like your date is stored not only with year-month-day info but with hours, minutes, seconds and miliseconds.

There can be two solutions:

  1. Make sure you are set not year-month-day part to zero

  2. Search by range: date >= currentDay && date < nextDay

share|improve this answer
    
According to the GAE Search API documentation, date fields are stored only as YYYY-MM-DD (without any Time information). – WATTO Studios Sep 4 '13 at 13:44
    
The GAE documentation says that Time information is stripped out of Date fields when storing the Document. Additionally, it says that Date queries support equality, and only take the YYYY-MM-DD into account. Refer to the documentation links in my question (updated) – WATTO Studios Sep 4 '13 at 13:53
    
Well, by your link I just found that date field represents java.util.Date object. As you probably know it has time information. – alexey28 Sep 4 '13 at 15:05
    
One more thing - this is PREVIEW release of search API. So it can work in other way comparing to what in documentation. – alexey28 Sep 4 '13 at 15:08

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