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I'm using pandas to perform some string matching from a Twitter dataset.

I've imported a CSV of Tweets and indexed using the date. I've then created a new column containing text matches:

In [1]:
import pandas as pd
indata = pd.read_csv('tweets.csv')
indata.index = pd.to_datetime(indata["Date"])
indata["matches"] = indata.Tweet.str.findall("rudd|abbott")
only_results = pd.Series(indata["matches"])
only_results.head(10)

Out[1]:
Date
2013-08-06 16:03:17          []
2013-08-06 16:03:12          []
2013-08-06 16:03:10          []
2013-08-06 16:03:09          []
2013-08-06 16:03:08          []
2013-08-06 16:03:07          []
2013-08-06 16:03:07    [abbott]
2013-08-06 16:03:06          []
2013-08-06 16:03:02          []
2013-08-06 16:03:00      [rudd]
Name: matches, dtype: object

What I want to end up with is a dataframe, grouped by day/month, that I can plot the different search terms as columns and then plot.

I came across what looks like the perfect solution on another SO answer (http://stackoverflow.com/a/16637607/2034487) but when trying to apply to this series, I'm getting an exception:

In [2]: only_results.apply(lambda x: pd.Series(1,index=x)).fillna(0)
Out [2]: Exception - Traceback (most recent call last)
...
Exception: Reindexing only valid with uniquely valued Index objects

I really want to be able to apply the changes within the dataframe to apply and reapply groupby conditions and perform the plots efficiently - and would love to learn more about how the .apply() method works.

Thanks in advance.

UPDATE AFTER SUCCESSFUL ANSWER

The issue was with duplicates in the "matches" column that I hadn't seen. I iterated through that column to remove duplicates and then used the original solution from @Jeff linked above. This was successful, and I can now .groupby() on the resultant series to see daily, hourly, etc, trends. Here's an example of the resultant plot:

In [3]: successful_run = only_results.apply(lambda x: pd.Series(1,index=x)).fillna(0)
In [4]: successful_run.groupby([successful_run.index.day,successful_run.index.hour]).sum().plot()

Out [4]: <matplotlib.axes.AxesSubplot at 0x110b51650>

Plot grouped by day and hour

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You've got some duplicate result (e.g. Rudd appears more than once in a single tweet), hence the Exception (see below).

I think it's going to be preferable to count occurences rather than list from a findall (pandas datastructures aren't designed to contain lists, although str.findall uses them).
I would recommend using something like this:

In [1]: s = pd.Series(['aa', 'aba', 'b'])

In [2]: pd.DataFrame({key: s.str.count(key) for key in ['a', 'b']})
Out[2]: 
   a  b
0  2  0
1  2  1
2  0  1

Note (the exception because of the duplicate 'a's found in the first two rows):

In [3]: s.str.findall('a').apply(lambda x: pd.Series(1,index=x)).fillna(0)
#InvalidIndexError: Reindexing only valid with uniquely valued Index objects
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Andy - I'll run the code this morning (I'm in Sydney) and mark as accepted once I'm sorted. –  Phil Sheard Sep 5 '13 at 0:18
    
I've marked this as accepted as it pointed out the main issue - the duplicates in the lambda function. I didn't actually need the duplicates, they were just 'tags' against the message. Instead of actually following @Andy's method, I de-duped the "matches" column and then successfully from Jeff in the earlier answer. –  Phil Sheard Sep 5 '13 at 8:30

First reset the index, then use the solution you mentioned:

In [28]: s
Out[28]:
Date
2013-08-06 16:03:17          []
2013-08-06 16:03:12          []
2013-08-06 16:03:10          []
2013-08-06 16:03:09          []
2013-08-06 16:03:08          []
2013-08-06 16:03:07          []
2013-08-06 16:03:07    [abbott]
2013-08-06 16:03:06          []
2013-08-06 16:03:02          []
2013-08-06 16:03:00      [rudd]
Name: matches, dtype: object

In [29]: df = s.reset_index()

In [30]: df.join(df.matches.apply(lambda x: Series(1, index=x)).fillna(0))
Out[30]:
                 Date   matches  abbott  rudd
0 2013-08-06 16:03:17        []       0     0
1 2013-08-06 16:03:12        []       0     0
2 2013-08-06 16:03:10        []       0     0
3 2013-08-06 16:03:09        []       0     0
4 2013-08-06 16:03:08        []       0     0
5 2013-08-06 16:03:07        []       0     0
6 2013-08-06 16:03:07  [abbott]       1     0
7 2013-08-06 16:03:06        []       0     0
8 2013-08-06 16:03:02        []       0     0
9 2013-08-06 16:03:00    [rudd]       0     1

Unless you have a clear use case for a DatetimeIndex (usually involves resampling of some kind, and no duplicates) you're better off putting your dates into a column, as it's more flexible than keeping it as an index, especially if said index has duplicates.

As far as the apply method goes, it does slightly different things for different objects. For example, DataFrame.apply() will apply the passed in callable across the columns by default, but you can pass axis=1 to apply it along the rows.

Series.apply() applies the passed in callable to each element of the Series instance. In the case of the very clever solution provided by @Jeff, what's happening is the following:

In [12]: s
Out[12]:
Date
2013-08-06 16:03:17          []
2013-08-06 16:03:12          []
2013-08-06 16:03:10          []
2013-08-06 16:03:09          []
2013-08-06 16:03:08          []
2013-08-06 16:03:07          []
2013-08-06 16:03:07    [abbott]
2013-08-06 16:03:06          []
2013-08-06 16:03:02          []
2013-08-06 16:03:00      [rudd]
Name: matches, dtype: object

In [13]: pd.lib.map_infer(s.values, lambda x: Series(1, index=x)).tolist()
Out[13]:
[Series([], dtype: int64),
 Series([], dtype: int64),
 Series([], dtype: int64),
 Series([], dtype: int64),
 Series([], dtype: int64),
 Series([], dtype: int64),
 abbott    1
dtype: int64,
 Series([], dtype: int64),
 Series([], dtype: int64),
 rudd    1
dtype: int64]

In [14]: pd.core.frame._to_arrays(_13, columns=None)
Out[14]:
(array([[ nan,  nan,  nan,  nan,  nan,  nan,   1.,  nan,  nan,  nan],
       [ nan,  nan,  nan,  nan,  nan,  nan,  nan,  nan,  nan,   1.]]),
 Index([u'abbott', u'rudd'], dtype=object))

Each empty Series in Out[13] is given a value of nan to indicate that there is no value at the either of our column indices. In this case, that index is Index([u'abbott', u'rudd'], dtype=object). Where there is a value at the column index it is retained.

Keep in mind that these are low-level details that users usually don't have to worry about. I was curious, so I followed the trail of code.

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1  
I don't think the reason for the exception is because of duplicates in the DatetimeIndex, but rather in the x of Series(1, index=x) (I could be wrong).... –  Andy Hayden Sep 4 '13 at 20:40
    
@AndyHayden You're right. In fact, I can't reproduce the exception using the OP's data. –  Phillip Cloud Sep 4 '13 at 20:43
1  
You can reproduce it with dupes in the findall (see my answer), I think Jeff's apply solution should work fine with dupes in the DatetimeIndex. –  Andy Hayden Sep 4 '13 at 20:51
1  
@AndyHayden It's when you have something like ['rudd', 'rudd'] in your data that this fails (as per your example). This is because you cannot create an indexer for a dupe index. Try i = Index(['a', 'a']); i.get_indexer(i) –  Phillip Cloud Sep 4 '13 at 21:01
    
oh, so this is more an exposition of Jeff's witty answer. (I was confused!) –  Andy Hayden Sep 4 '13 at 21:03

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