Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm very new to JavaScript and jQuery and I'm having trouble with a bit of code.

HTML:

<div class="toggle" style="display: block; width: 200px; height: 200px; background-color: red;">test</div>

JavaScript:

jQuery(document).ready(
    function()
    {
        jQuery(".toggle").on("click", function() {
            console.log("let the toggling begin!");

            jQuery(this).slideToggle(600, function(){ // slide up
                setTimeout(function(){ // wait 4 sec, then slide back down
                    jQuery(this).slideToggle(600)
                }, 4000);
            });
        });
    }
);

So the idea is that you click on the div, it slides up, then 4 seconds later slides back down. It doesn't work.

JSFIDDLE: http://jsfiddle.net/zEqN9/2/

However, if I change the this inside each of the closures to ".toggle", then it does work.

JSFIDDLE: http://jsfiddle.net/YZxMb/

So clearly the issue is my use of this.

I tried passing this as a parameter into each of the two closure functions, but that gave the error Unexpected token this.

How can I access the this variable from the inner functions?

share|improve this question
1  
Using "this" in a callback is a question that was probably asked 10000 times. –  Virus721 Sep 4 '13 at 13:18
    
@Virus721 - I did several searches and read many of the related questions before submitting my question, but perhaps I used the wrong terminology when searching.. –  Nate Sep 4 '13 at 13:22
1  
This is a common gotcha as it's meaning is defined at execution time and can change depending on how a function has been called. There is a detailed discussion here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3127429/javascript-this-keyword –  morechilli Sep 4 '13 at 13:26
2  
Note that jQuery(this).slideToggle(600).delay(4000).slideToggle(600); will achieve the effect you're after in a way that is a lot easier to write and read. (Not that it's a bad idea to learn how to deal with the this issue, since there are other cases where you definitely need to know about that.) –  nnnnnn Sep 4 '13 at 13:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Create a reference to this in slideToggle function.

 jQuery(document).ready(
    function()
    {
        jQuery(".toggle").on("click", function() {
            console.log("let the toggling begin!");

            jQuery(this).slideToggle(600, function(){ // slide up
                var self = this; // <-- notice this
                setTimeout(function(){ // wait 4 sec, then slide back down
                    jQuery(self).slideToggle(600)
                }, 4000);
            });
        });
    }
);
share|improve this answer
    
The only answer that actually explains the code. Thank you. –  Seiyria Sep 4 '13 at 13:22

Use bind to specify a this for a function you expect to call out of context.

var foo = {
    bar: function () {
        setTimeout(function () { // though in a setTimeout
            console.log(this);
        }.bind(this), 0); // binding to `this` here means
    }
};

foo.bar(); // invoking it still has `this` of `foo`
share|improve this answer
    
True, but not fully supported (e.g. IE8). –  cbuckley Sep 4 '13 at 13:29
    
There is a shim in the linked article for those browsers –  Paul S. Sep 4 '13 at 13:32
var yourThing = jQuery(this);

yourThing.slideToggle(600, function(){ // slide up
     setTimeout(function(){ // wait 4 sec, then slide back down
          yourThing.slideToggle(600)
     }, 4000);
});
share|improve this answer

Just add this line in your code to understand why:

setTimeout(function(){ // wait 4 sec, then slide back down
      console.log(jQuery(this)); //this one
      jQuery(this).slideToggle(600)
      }, 4000);

Open your console. You will see that, in the setTimeout function, $(this) refers to the window object.

share|improve this answer

You need a create a referente to this,so when runs the function associate to setTimeout you can pass this reference.

 jQuery(document).ready(
        function()
        {
            jQuery(".toggle").on("click", function() {
                console.log("let the toggling begin!");
                var that = this; // <--- reference to this
                jQuery(this).slideToggle(600, function(){ // slide up
                    setTimeout(function(){ // wait 4 sec, then slide back down
                        jQuery(that).slideToggle(600)
                    }, 4000);
                });
            });
        }
    );
share|improve this answer

The reason is that for a jQuery event, the context of the function is explicitly set so that this refers to the target element - this is done for you by jQuery. However, the anonymous function for setTimeout doesn't have that context set for you - it gets the default global context, so this refers to the window.

What you need to do is grab a reference to the click event's context, and then use the reference in the timeout:

jQuery(function () {
    jQuery(".toggle").on("click", function () {
        var $this = $(this);

        $this.slideToggle(600, function () { // slide up
            setTimeout(function () { // wait 4 sec, then slide back down
                $this.slideToggle(600);
            }, 4000);
        });
    });
});

However, as pointed out in a comment, this could be written as:

jQuery(function () {
    jQuery(".toggle").click(function () {
        jQuery(this).slideToggle(600).delay(4000).slideToggle(600);
    });
});
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.