Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::vector<std::string> vec;
    std::string line;
    std::ifstream in(argv[1]);
    while(!in.eof()) {
        std::getline(in,line);
        vec.push_back(line);
    }
    std::istringstream is;
    line = "";
    for(auto a:vec) {
        for(auto i = a.begin(); i != a.end(); i++) {
            if(!(isspace(*i) | ispunct(*i)))
                line += *i;
            else {
                is.str(line);
                std::cout << is.str() << std::endl;
                line = "";
            }
        }
    }
    std::cout << is.str() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

I've written a program that takes a file and puts each line in a vector of strings. Then reads one word at a time from the element.

When I'm reading from the vector I am having trouble specifying new lines. My output concatenates the end of one line and the beginning of the next. How can I specify that there is a new line?

The file content that I'm reading:

Math 3 2
Math 4 3
Math 5 4
Phys 3 1
Math 3 1
Comp 3 2

The output I'm getting:

Math
3
2Math
4
3Math
5
4Phys
3
1Math
3
1Comp
3
3

EDIT::

To clarify, the vector elements are constructed correctly. If I print a in from the for(auto a:vec), it will give me line by line just like the file. It's when I try to build the word from each char in the vector. I am asking what can I do to specify that there is a new line so that the

line += a[i] 

does not keep adding to line when it hits the end of one line.

share|improve this question
    
Just a side note: I personally would prefer using a traditional for loop instead of for(auto a:vec) to avoid code such as if(!(isspace(*i) | ispunct(*i))) line += *i; :) –  LihO Sep 4 '13 at 14:39
    
I was going to go the other way: for (auto c:a) here fits real nice. –  jthill Sep 4 '13 at 14:46
    
To eliminate another of the redundancies, you can just spit line directly, no need to construct a stringstream. –  jthill Sep 4 '13 at 14:50
    
Comrade: std::getline does not deliver the line terminator. Hint #2: under what circumstances can you read a character from a and not spit a newline? Hint #3: try adding a space to the end of each input line to see what's going on here.. –  jthill Sep 4 '13 at 14:54
    
for(auto c:a) prints each char. I would still have to specify not to append to the string when there is a space or punctuation or new line, which I have not been able to figure how to specify. –  Zaphod Sep 4 '13 at 14:54

3 Answers 3

Don't do

while (!in.eof()) { ... }

It will not work the way you expect it to.

Instead do

while (std::getline(...)) { ... }

The reason for this is because the eof flag isn't set until you actually try to read when the file is at the end. This means that you will loop one time to many, trying to read a non-existent line which you then add to your vector.


There is also another way of separating "words" on space boundary, by using std::istringstream and the normal input operator >>:

std::istringstream is{a};

std::string word;
while (is >> word)
{
    // Do something with `word`
}
share|improve this answer
    
And within while (std::getline(in, line)) { loop, one might also use line.empty() to make sure empty lines are not being read :) –  LihO Sep 4 '13 at 14:37
    
Let me clarify. The output after constructing the vector gives me the correct vector elements. It is the second part I am having trouble with. When I am building the words from chars. –  Zaphod Sep 4 '13 at 14:38
    
Worth to note that std::istringstream is{a} is a C++11 syntax. –  LihO Sep 4 '13 at 14:41
1  
@Comrade I just updated my answer with another way of splitting a line on whitespace. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 4 '13 at 14:42
    
@JoachimPileborg. I appreciate your answer. I tried this and it works but it's an alternative answer. Is there a simple way to use built in functions like ispunct() to identify that there was a new line? –  Zaphod Sep 4 '13 at 14:53

The actual problem here is error in logic of your code. Here's the pseudocode of what you are doing while printing the output:

for every line:
    for every character in the line:
        if it is alphanumerical character
            then add it to the word
        else
            print the so-far built word

now look at the line Math 4 3 ~> after the word "4" is printed, this code adds character '3' into the line but does not print it as a word, thus 3 is the beginning of the word of the next line.

Also note that your code is far more complicated than it is necessary. It could look like this instead:

std::string word;
for (size_t i = 0; i < vec.size(); ++i) {
    std::istringstream lineStream(vec[i]);
    while (lineStream >> word)
        std::cout << word << std::endl;
}

But in case you want to keep the original code, here's what you might do to fix this behavior:

line = "";
for(auto a:vec) {
    for(auto i = a.begin(); i != a.end(); i++) {
        if (isalnum(*i))
            line += *i;
        else {
            std::cout << line << std::endl;
            line = "";
        }
    }

    // before we start processing the next element...
    // in case there's another line to be printed:
    if (!line.empty()) {
        // print the line and reset the variable:
        std::cout << line << std::endl;
        line = "";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes the code is missing a new line specifier. I am asking what is a way to specify that there is a new line. –  Zaphod Sep 4 '13 at 15:02
    
Yes I know there is an alternative way to do this but what I'm after is how to specify when I get a new line when I am adding chars to a string. I've had this issue before and that is what I want to know. –  Zaphod Sep 4 '13 at 15:05
    
@Comrade: I think you want to keep the original code. Check the edit of my answer if I understood you correctly. –  LihO Sep 4 '13 at 15:08
    
There is no doubt that this works and it's a good method given the original code. Is there simply no way to specify an end of line using logic and characters like '\n'? –  Zaphod Sep 4 '13 at 15:27

You can also read line by line by using a vector like this;

Vector definition ;

    struct VectorName {
       std::string str;
       float num1;
       float num2;
};

std::vector <VectorName> smthVector_;

use of function

   VectorName vector;
   std::string str;
   char buf_1[50];
   while(std::getline(in, str))
   {
       if(sscanf(str.c_str(), "%s %f %f", buf_1, &vector.num1, &vector.num2) == 3)
       {
           vector.str = buf_1;
           smthVector_push_back(vector);
       }
        else
            std::cout << "No param in string  " << str << std::endl;
   }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.