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I have a varchar column in a SQL Server 2005 table that looks like the following:

Mainly Sunny, 13.7°C
Partly cloudy, 12°C, Humidity 69%, Wind NE 15km/h

My goal is to parse out the temperature values, 13.7 and 12 respectively. Is there a series of string functions that can be used to locate and retrieve the first word in each string that contains °C?

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1  
Look into CHARINDEX and PATINDEX – Adam Wenger Sep 4 '13 at 15:21
1  
Yes, you can do this, but it's extremely ugly. Have you considered storing these different bits of information in their own columns? – Aaron Bertrand Sep 4 '13 at 15:32
    
@AaronBertrand My end goal is to use persisted calculated columns to hold the values I'm looking for. – dangowans Sep 4 '13 at 15:37
3  
But why not just insert them separate in the first place? – Aaron Bertrand Sep 4 '13 at 15:38
    
@AaronBertrand I guess I could parse out the required fields beforehand. I need to keep the raw text for auditing purposes. I figure that by using a calculated field based on that raw text, rather than a parsed out field not connected to the original text, I'd have a field that is easier to explain and has more integrity in the eyes of the auditors. – dangowans Sep 4 '13 at 17:15
up vote 3 down vote accepted
DECLARE @t TABLE(s VARCHAR(255));

INSERT @t SELECT 'Mainly Sunny, 13.7°C'
UNION ALL SELECT 'Partly cloudy, 12°C, Humidity 69%, Wind NE 15km/h';

SELECT RIGHT(LEFT(s, CHARINDEX('°', s)-1), 
  CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(LEFT(s, CHARINDEX('°', s)-1)))-1) FROM @t;

So, as a computed column:

DECLARE @t TABLE
(
  s VARCHAR(255), 
  x AS CONVERT(VARCHAR(255),RIGHT(LEFT(s, CHARINDEX('°', s)-1), 
    CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(LEFT(s, CHARINDEX('°', s)-1)))-1)) PERSISTED
);

INSERT @t SELECT 'Mainly Sunny, 13.7°C'
UNION ALL SELECT 'Partly cloudy, 12°C, Humidity 69%, Wind NE 15km/h';

SELECT s,x FROM @t;

Results:

Mainly Sunny, 13.7°C                                  13.7
Partly cloudy, 12°C, Humidity 69%, Wind NE 15km/h     12

If you might have strings that don't contain a ° symbol, then:

DECLARE @t TABLE
(
  s VARCHAR(255), 
  x AS CONVERT(VARCHAR(255), CASE WHEN CHARINDEX('°', s) > 0 THEN 
    RIGHT(LEFT(s, CHARINDEX('°', s)-1), 
    CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(LEFT(s, CHARINDEX('°', s)-1)))-1) END) PERSISTED
);

INSERT @t SELECT 'Mainly Sunny, 13.7°C'
UNION ALL SELECT 'Partly cloudy, 12°C, Humidity 69%, Wind NE 15km/h'
UNION ALL SELECT 'No weather to report';

SELECT s,x FROM @t;

Results:

Mainly Sunny, 13.7°C                                  13.7
Partly cloudy, 12°C, Humidity 69%, Wind NE 15km/h     12
No weather to report                                  NULL

(If you want something else instead of NULL, I can't imagine what, you can add an ELSE to the CASE expression.)

Also, to prove my solution is flexible without introducing a performance-crippling user-defined function:

DECLARE @SearchString VARCHAR(8000);
SET @SearchString = 'km/h'; -- change this to '°'

DECLARE @t TABLE
(
  s VARCHAR(255)
);

INSERT @t SELECT 'Mainly Sunny, 13.7°C'
UNION ALL SELECT 'Partly cloudy, 12°C, Humidity 69%, Wind NE 15km/h'
UNION ALL SELECT 'No weather to report'
UNION ALL SELECT 'Wind 102km/h, 23.5°C, mostly cloudy';

SELECT s, x = CONVERT(VARCHAR(255), CASE WHEN CHARINDEX(@SearchString, s) > 0 THEN 
    RIGHT(LEFT(s, CHARINDEX(@SearchString, s)-1), 
    CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(LEFT(s, CHARINDEX(@SearchString, s)-1)))-1) END)
FROM @t;

Results:

Mainly Sunny, 13.7°C                                NULL
Partly cloudy, 12°C, Humidity 69%, Wind NE 15km/h   15
No weather to report                                NULL
Wind 102km/h, 23.5°C, mostly cloudy                 102
share|improve this answer
    
I was able to make your solution work. Thanks for your help. – dangowans Sep 4 '13 at 19:10

Thank you @AdamWenger and @AaronBertrand for the great tips and the great answer. In the end, I went with something a bit more flexible. I want to have the ability to find words containing strings other than °C as well.

I ended up using a user defined function to parse out the first occurrence of a word containing a given string. It may be messy, and it's the first real user defined function I've written myself, but here's what I came up with.

CREATE function [dbo].[firstWordContaining] 
(@BigString varchar(max), @SearchString varchar(max))
returns varchar(max)
as
begin

-- Handle when search string is not in the big string
if (charindex(@SearchString,@BigString) = 0)
return null

-- Handle when search string is at the beginning
if (charindex(@SearchString,@BigString) = 1)
return substring(@BigString, 0, charindex(' ',@BigString))

-- Eliminate all words before the identified word
declare @Partial varchar(max)
select @Partial = substring(
@BigString,
charindex(@SearchString, @BigString) - charindex(' ',reverse(left(@BigString,charindex(@SearchString, @BigString)))) + 2, 
len(@BigString))

declare @Final varchar(max)
select @Final = case 

-- Handle when the search string is in the middle of the big string
when (charindex(' ',@Partial) > 0) then left(@Partial, charindex(' ',@Partial))

-- Handle when the search string is at the end of the big string
else @Partial
end

return @Final

end

So, if I do select dbo.firstWordContaining('Mainly Sunny, 13.7°C','°C'), I end up with 13.7°C.

If I do select dbo.firstWordContaining('Partly cloudy, 12°C, Humidity 69%, Wind NE 15km/h','°C'), I end up with 12°C,.

The remaining punctuation is easy enough to strip out.

share|improve this answer
    
This may be more flexible, but a scalar function for this is going to be terrible (and I don't know what success you'll have using the output of a scalar function as a computed column). String parsing isn't SQL Server's strong suit, which is why I suggest doing this parsing first, in the application. Go ahead and store the whole string for auditing, but have the application pull out the important pieces and store those separately from the start. This is madness. – Aaron Bertrand Sep 4 '13 at 17:39
    
Please see my updated answer, which is fully capable of grabbing other data from the string (such as the numeric value for km/h). – Aaron Bertrand Sep 4 '13 at 17:45
    
@AaronBertrand Hmm. I'm not trying to go for madness. Maybe I'll look and see what's involved with parsing the string first. – dangowans Sep 4 '13 at 17:46

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