Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was looking through the ruby Kernel doc and saw this method:

a = 2
local_variables # => [:a, :_]

Why does it return :a and not a? I thought the ":" was reserved for symbols, but the symbol :a doesn't point to the variable a nor to it's assigned value, 2.

Furthermore, how would I go about accessing the actual variables through this method? As in b=local_variables.first (would be 2, but is :a).

Is there a reason behind this behavior, what is it?

Thanks/

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why does it return :a and not a? I thought the ":" was reserved for symbols

It's the expected behavior. According to the docs:

Returns the names of the current local variables.

So yes, this just returns an array of symbols.


Furthermore, how would I go about accessing the actual variables through this method?

As noted by Jonathan Camenisch, Ruby 2.1 introduced Binding#local_variable_get:

a = 2
binding.local_variable_get(:a)
#=> 2

For older Rubies, you could use eval:

a = 2
eval(:a.to_s)
#=> 2

Is there a reason behind this behavior, what is it?

In Ruby symbols are used for references:

"foo".methods
#=> [:<=>, :==, :===, :eql?, :hash, :casecmp, ...]

Module.constants
#=> [:Object, :Module, :Class, :BasicObject, :Kernel, :NilClass, ...]
share|improve this answer
1  
Rather than eval (:a.to_s), you could use binding.local_variable_get(:a). So to list all inputs or local variables: def show_inputs(a, b, c) Hash[local_variables.map { |name| [name, binding.local_variable_get(name)] }] end show_inputs('one', 'two', 'three') #=> {:a=>"one", :b=>"two", :c=>"three"} –  Jonathan Camenisch Jun 18 '14 at 15:46
    
So, that doesn't work very well. Here's what I meant that to look like: gist.github.com/jcamenisch/f7a3daee296e619086c9 –  Jonathan Camenisch Jun 18 '14 at 15:50
1  
@JonathanCamenisch thanks, I've updated my answer –  Stefan Jun 18 '14 at 16:01

Why does it return :a and not a?

It can't return a, because a is a variable and variables aren't objects in Ruby. Methods can only take, return, and manipulate objects.

share|improve this answer

how would I go about accessing the actual variables through this method?

Humm.here you can go:-

a = 2
b = 10
local_variables.each{|e| p eval(e.to_s)}
# >> 2
# >> 10

Why does it return :a and not a?

That answer has been given by @Stefan. But you can get here some more taste:-

13 Ways of Looking at a Ruby Symbol

Out of these the below is related to your answer:-

7. A Ruby symbol is a Ruby identifier

In Ruby, we can look up identifiers (variable, methods and constant names) while the program is running. This is typically done using symbols.

class Demo
  # The stuff we'll look up.
  DEFAULT = "Hello"
  def initialize
    @message = DEFAULT
  end
  def say() @message end

  # Use symbols to look up identifiers.
  def look_up_with_symbols
    [Demo.const_get(:DEFAULT),
     method(:say),
     instance_variable_get(:@message)]
  end
end

Demo.new.look_up_with_symbols
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that link too, it helped a lot –  ZirconCode Sep 5 '13 at 2:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.