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I am using following code to insert a row in database. I always get ERROR

{"error":"SQLSTATE[42000]: Syntax error or access violation: 1064 You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'show) VALUES('A E Jewelers','Quintin','Schmidt','131 South Rolling Meadows Dr.',' at line 1"}

Here is my query

xxx/webservice/api.php?action=addStore&name=A%20E%20Jewelers&firstname=Quintin&lastname=Schmidt&address=131%20South%20Rolling%20Meadows%20Dr.&city=Fond%20du%20Lac&state=WI&country=USA&zip=54935&phone=(920)%20933%203601%0A&fax=(920)%20486-1734&email=Diadori@aejewelers.com&latitude=43.775931&longitude=-88.482894&website=www.aejewelers.com&show=1

    function AddStore() 
    {
        $name = trim($_REQUEST['name']);
        $firstname = trim($_REQUEST['firstname']);
        $lastname  = trim($_REQUEST['lastname']);
        $address = trim($_REQUEST['address']);
        $city = trim($_REQUEST['city']);
        $state = trim($_REQUEST['state']);
        $country = trim($_REQUEST['country']);
        $zip = trim($_REQUEST['zip']);
        $phone = trim($_REQUEST['phone']);
        $fax = trim($_REQUEST['fax']);
        $email = trim($_REQUEST['email']);
        $latitude = trim($_REQUEST['latitude']);        
        $longitude = trim($_REQUEST['longitude']);      
        $website = trim($_REQUEST['website']);      
        $show = 1;      

        return $show;
        $insert_id = 0;
        try {
            $conn = $this->GetDBConnection();
            $statement = $conn->prepare('INSERT INTO stores( name, firstname, lastname, address, city, state, country, zip, phone, fax, email, latitude,longitude, website,show) VALUES(:name,:firstname,:lastname,:address,:city,:state,:country,:zip,:phone,:fax, :email, :phone, :zip)');

            $statement->bindParam(':name',      $name, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':firstname', $firstname, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':lastname' , $lastname, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':address',   $address, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':city',      $city, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':state',     $state, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':country',   $country, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':zip',       $zip, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':phone',     $phone, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':fax'    ,   $fax, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':email'    , $email, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':latitude' , $latitude, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':longitude', $longitude, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':website'  , $website, PDO::PARAM_STR);
            $statement->bindParam(':show'     , $show, PDO::PARAM_INT);

            $statement->execute();

            $insert_id = $conn->lastInsertId();

            $conn = null;
        } catch(PDOException $e) {
            throw $e;
        }

        return $insert_id;
    }
share|improve this question
1  
SHOW is a reserved word in MySQL. You can escape it with backticks, but it's better to avoid reserved words for column and table names in the first place. –  andrewsi Sep 4 '13 at 16:37
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Replace the column name show with `show`

INSERT INTO stores( 
     name, firstname, lastname, address, city, state, 
     country, zip, phone, fax, email, latitude,longitude, 
     website,`show`)
VALUES (:name,:firstname,:lastname,:address,:city,
     :state,:country,:zip,:phone,:fax, :email, 
     :phone, :zip)'

The word show is a keyword in SQL

share|improve this answer
    
oh great thanks. –  Muhammad Umar Sep 4 '13 at 16:40
    
Better still, rename the column to something other than "show". –  Andy Lester Sep 4 '13 at 16:50
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It's good practice to always wrap field names and table names in backticks ` to prevent this common "gotcha" with accidentally using a reserved keyword. There are an amazing number of reserved words in SQL, so it's probably easier just to backtick names rather than remembering to check each field or table name used.

I take it you have confirmed that none of the values are empty/null or have embedded spaces, quotes, or commas? Does the PDO library take care of escaping quotes (e.g., Mrs. O'Leary's Cow) and wrapping the data in quotes?

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm. I swear I clicked "add comment"... –  Phil Perry Sep 4 '13 at 17:34
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