Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to plot a 2d data set with matplotlib such that the marker color for each data point is different. I found the example on multicolored lines (http://matplotlib.org/examples/pylab_examples/multicolored_line.html). However, this does not seem to work when plotting a line with markers.

The solution I came up with individually plots every point:

import matplotlib.cm as cm
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

# The data
x = np.linspace(0, 10, 1000)
y = np.sin(2 * np.pi * x)

# The colormap
cmap = cm.jet

# Create figure and axes
fig = plt.figure(1)
fig.clf()
ax = fig.add_subplot(1, 1, 1)

# Plot every single point with different color
for i in range(len(x)):
    c = cmap(int(np.rint(x[i] / x.max() * 255)))
    ax.plot(x[i], y[i], 'o', mfc=c, mec=c)
    ax.set_xlim([x[0], x[-1]])
    ax.set_ylim([-1.1, 1.1])
    ax.set_xlabel('x')
    ax.set_ylabel('y')

plt.draw()
plt.show()

# Save the figure
fig.savefig('changing_marker_color.png', dpi=80)

The resulting plot looks like as it should but the plotting gets really slow and I need it quite fast. Is there a clever trick to speed up the plotting?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I believe you can achieve this with ax.scatter:

# The data
x = np.linspace(0, 10, 1000)
y = np.sin(2 * np.pi * x)

# The colormap
cmap = cm.jet

# Create figure and axes
fig = plt.figure(1)
fig.clf()
ax = fig.add_subplot(1, 1, 1)

c = np.linspace(0, 10, 1000)
ax.scatter(x, y, c=c, cmap=cmap)

Scatter accepts c as a sequence of floats which will be mapped to colors using the cmap.

enter image description here

Using timeit I get a 10 fold decrease in time (about 1.25 secs for the original method and 76.8 ms here)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.