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I have several sets of radio buttons on a form - they all need to be independent (in pairs). When a set called "time" are selected I need 'Yes' to show <p> and no to leave it hidden. I have set <p> as hidden using CSS and the below code works on 1 set of radio buttons however when I start adding the others in I don't want selecting 'Yes' on this first set to show all <p> across the from (to differentiate <p> I will be calling them <p1>, <p2> etc...

How do I name the radio buttons in the below script to only affect the

with the 'time' radio buttons are selected.

<script>
$(document).ready(function(){
    $(":radio:eq(0)").click(function(){
        $("p").show();
    });

    $(":radio:eq(1)").click(function(){
        $("p").hide();
    });
});
</script>

HTML is:

 Can we call Ph before 9am: 
<input type="radio" name="9am" value="Yes">Yes
<input type="radio" name="9am" value="No">No<br>
<p class="hidden">Yes We can call Ph before 9am</p>

UPDATE **

What I don't understand is how the jQuery knows that I am referencing this specific set of radio buttons (and when I add another set how it will know I am specifically referencing them). Do I not need to include a 'name' of the radio buttons in the jQuery for each set of radio buttons to differentiate them from each other?

FURTHER UPDATE **

<script>
$(document).ready(function(){
    $(":radio:eq(0)").click(function(){
        $("p").show();
    });
    $(":radio:eq(1)").click(function(){
        $("p").hide();
    });
});
</script>

HTML

 Can we call Ph before 9am: 
<input type="radio" name="9am" value="Yes">Yes
<input type="radio" name="9am" value="No">No<br>
<p class="hidden">Yes We can call Ph before 9am</p><br>

Vulnerability:
<input type="radio" name="vulnerabille" value="Yes">Yes
<input type="radio" name="vulnerable" value="No">No<br>
<p class="vulnerability">What is the vulnerability:</h1><br>

CSS

<style>
p.hidden {display:none;}
h1.hidden {display:none;}
</style>

I have updated the code so you have a better idea of what I am trying to do.

At the moment when I click Yes on either set of radio buttons they both have the same affect over both <p> sections. I only want the radio button to affect the <p> directly beneath it.

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1  
And what does this HTML look like; please show us a minimal example of your HTML structure so we can see what's going on. And a live demo is always helpful. –  David Thomas Sep 4 '13 at 17:50
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4 Answers

One approach, to work with your HTML as-written, is as follows:

$('input[type="radio"]').change(function () {
    $(this).nextAll('p.hidden').first().toggle(this.value == 'Yes');
}).change();

JS Fiddle demo.

A slightly improved HTML, in that it allows for the user to click the text labelling the elements, since that text (and the input are both wrapped in a label element) is as follows:

<div class="question">
    <label>
    <input type="radio" name="9am" value="Yes" />Yes
    </label>
    <label>
    <input type="radio" name="9am" value="No" checked />No
    </label>
    <br />
    <p class="hidden">Yes We can call Ph before 9am</p>
</div>
<div class="question">
    <label>
    <input type="radio" name="10am" value="Yes" />Yes
    </label>
    <label>
    <input type="radio" name="10am" value="No" checked />No
    </label>
    <br />
    <p class="hidden">Yes We can call Ph before 10am</p>
</div>

Which works with the jQuery:

$('input[type="radio"]').change(function () {
    $(this).closest('div.question').find('p.hidden').toggle(this.value == 'Yes');
}).change();

JS Fiddle demo.

References:

share|improve this answer
    
Well done, uses classes, the values of the current radio and seems pretty efficient.(+ for the improved HTML version) –  Mark Schultheiss Sep 4 '13 at 20:38
    
Thanks for the help David - I have seen it working on JS Fiddle demo but still cant seem to get it working. I am still using the p.hidded {display:none;} CSS for this - is that correct? I noticed on your demo that there was no CSS so is this what is still causing me problems? –  Tom36 Sep 4 '13 at 21:20
    
Thanks David but this still isnt working for me for some reason - I dont know why!! I am still using the same CSS as in my code above - could this be a problem? I can see that there is no CSS in the JS Fiddle demo that you have for me. Any further advice on this would be great. Thanks –  Tom36 Sep 4 '13 at 21:27
    
Why not show me what you're trying, in your own demo? The one thing I omit from the demo is wrapping the above jQuery: $(document).ready(function(){ /* code goes between these curly-braces */ }); Otherwise, are there any errors in your browser's JavaScript console (usually ctrl+shift+i, or F12 in your browser). –  David Thomas Sep 4 '13 at 21:48
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You use following code for this.

<script>
$(document).ready(function(){
    $("input[type=radio]").click(function(){
      if($(this).attr('value') == 'Yes')
         $("p").show();
      else
         $("p").hide();
    });
});
</script>
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jQuery's :eq(index) selector filters the matched elements down to the element at the specified [zero-based] index in the set. Given your markup, the :eq(index) selector matches the following:

Can we call Ph before 9am: 
<input type="radio" name="9am" value="Yes">Yes              <!-- radio:eq(0) -->
<input type="radio" name="9am" value="No">No<br>            <!-- radio:eq(1) -->
<p class="hidden">Yes We can call Ph before 9am</p><br>

Vulnerability:
<input type="radio" name="vulnerabille" value="Yes">Yes     <!-- radio:eq(2) -->
<input type="radio" name="vulnerable" value="No">No<br>     <!-- radio:eq(3) -->
<p class="vulnerability">What is the vulnerability:</p><br>

One [not recommended] solution to ensure each radio button shows/hides the correct p element is to use CSS classes to differentiate each p and input[type="radio"] element. Here's an example:

HTML

Can we call Ph before 9am: 
<input type="radio" name="9am" value="Yes" class="question1">Yes              <!-- radio:eq(0) -->
<input type="radio" name="9am" value="No" class="question1">No<br>            <!-- radio:eq(1) -->
<p class="hidden question1">Yes We can call Ph before 9am</p><br>

Vulnerability:
<input type="radio" name="vulnerabille" value="Yes" class="question2">Yes     <!-- radio:eq(2) -->
<input type="radio" name="vulnerable" value="No" class="question2">No<br>     <!-- radio:eq(3) -->
<p class="vulnerability question2">What is the vulnerability:</p><br>

JavaScript

$('input[type="radio"].question1').on('change click', function(e) {
    $('.question1').show();
});

$('input[type="radio"].question2').on('change click', function(e) {
    $('.question2').show();
});

As I hope is evidenced by the example, that is going to be rather keyboard-intensive and is not a good abstract solution (which is why it is not recommended).

Another solution, and the one I would recommend is to change your markup to make it more abstract which will allow a more generic handler.

Revised HTML

<div class="question">
    <span class="question-text">Can we call Ph before 9am:</span>
    <input type="radio" id="rdo9AM_y" name="9am" value="Yes" class="question-type-yesno"><label for="rdo9AM_y">Yes</label>
    <input type="radio" id="rdo9AM_n" name="9am" value="No" class="question-type-yesno"><label for="rdo9AM_n">No</label>
    <p class="hidden show-confirm-answer early-call">Yes We can call Ph before 9am</p>
</div>
<div class="question">
    <span class="question-text">Vulnerability:</span>
    <input type="radio" id="rdoVul_y" name="vulnerable" value="Yes" class="question-type-yesno"><label for="rdoVul_y">Yes</label>
    <input type="radio" id="rdoVul_n" name="vulnerable" value="No" class="question-type-yesno"><label for="rdoVul_n">No</label>
    <p class="hidden show-confirm-answer vulnerability">What is the vulnerability:</p><br>
</div>

Abstracted JavaScript

$('div.question input[type="radio"].question-type-yesno').on('change click', function (e) {
    var self = $(this),
        isChecked = self.is(':checked'),
        val = self.val();
    self.siblings('p.show-confirm-answer').toggleClass('hidden', isChecked && val === 'No'); // applied class if "No" is checked, otherwise removes the "hidden" class.
});

Finally, for a solution that does not involve changing your markup and is abstract, go with the [beautiful, elegant] solution already provided by David Thomas (+1, David). His solution will work masterfully, provided the rest of your markup is consistent with what you have already posted.

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u can simply use the class="" attribute like

<p class="set1"> set one </p>
<p class="set2"> set one </p>


<script>
 $(document).ready(function(){
     $(":radio:eq(0)").click(function(){
         $(".set1").show();
      });

      $(":radio:eq(1)").click(function(){
         $(".set2").hide();
      });

});
</script>

the same selector you have to use in css to hide the sets

.set1 {display:none}
share|improve this answer
    
What I dont understand is how the Jquery knows that I am referencing this specific set of radio buttons (and when I add another set how it will know I am specifically referencing them). Do I not need to include a 'name' of the radio buttons in the Jquery for each set of radio buttons to differentiate them from each other? –  Tom36 Sep 4 '13 at 19:45
    
I have updated the code above so you have a better idea of what I am trying to do. I know I'm probably being a bit thick but Jquery is new to me. Thanks. –  Tom36 Sep 4 '13 at 20:08
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