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Due to the programming limitations of an ODBC driver we are using to set up a linked server in SQL Server, I have to use a cursor to process an insert to the linked server as the ODBC driver fails when attempting a set-based insert.

The code I am using is quite similar to the following:

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE curOutput CURSOR FOR    SELECT  QTY, QB_ITEM_ID, QB_ID, QB_Flag
            FROM        dbo.QB_INVOICELINES
            WHERE       QB_ID IS NOT NULL
            ORDER BY    QB_ID, QB_FLAG DESC, Transaction_Type ASC;

DECLARE @Quantity DECIMAL(18,2), @ItemID VARCHAR(100), @CustomerID VARCHAR(100), @QBFlag INT;

OPEN    curOutput

FETCH   NEXT
FROM    curOutput
INTO    @Quantity, @ItemID, @CustomerID, @QBFlag;
--Subroutine for QB insert
WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
    BEGIN
    INSERT INTO REMOTE...INVOICE_TEST (QB_ID,QB_ITEM_ID,Qty,QB_Flag)
        VALUES(@CustomerID,@ItemID,@Quantity,@QBFlag)
    PRINT   'Transaction quantity of ' + CAST(@Quantity AS VARCHAR(12)) +  '     for item ID ' + @ItemID + ' for customer ID ' + @CustomerID + ' is now posted.'

    FETCH   NEXT
    FROM    curOutput
    INTO    @Quantity,
        @ItemID,
        @CustomerID,
        @QBFlag;
END
--End subroutine for QB insert
CLOSE       curOutput
DEALLOCATE  curOutput

In processing the records, the @QBFlag is set to either a 1 or 0, with a 1 essentially instructing the ODBC driver to hold transactions in cache until a 0 is processed, at which time the transactions are posted to the linked server tables.

When using the above method, the driver will hum along quite nicely for several hundred rows (there are typically 7500 - 9000 rows to process), but will ultimately fail as I believe even though a cursor is processing the records one at a time it is still attempting to write to the table faster than the linked table can handle transactions.

Should I simply use a DELAY function or is there a better solution?

Cheers! Mike

share|improve this question
1  
better to find out why it fails. – Randy Sep 4 '13 at 18:04
2  
Yes there is a better way! Use SSIS and use a dataflow task to transfer your data from one server to another. With this cursor/linked server approach you are trying force a square peg through a round hole. – GarethD Sep 4 '13 at 18:06
1  
why not pull the data from the source to the target instead of pushing it from source to target? – swasheck Sep 4 '13 at 19:18
    
Chances are something isn't configured properly. I would recomend trying SSIS to do the insert. However you should not have to slow down the insert just because you're using ODBC. – Zane Sep 4 '13 at 19:48
    
The only reason I'm using a cursor at all is because the ODBC driver can't handle set-based inserts and was built to convert application-specific binary data to something that emulates a relational database and against which some SQL queries can be used. It's the nature of the underlying product that is requiring this methodology. – MikeM Sep 4 '13 at 22:35

You don't need a cursor. You can use a simple insert query:

insert into REMOTE...INVOICE_TEST 
(QB_ID,QB_ITEM_ID,Qty,QB_Flag)
SELECT  QTY, QB_ITEM_ID, QB_ID, QB_Flag
FROM dbo.QB_INVOICELINES
WHERE QB_ID IS NOT NULL
share|improve this answer
1  
You may have missed the line in the question that states ODBC driver fails when attempting a set-based insert., as stated in a comment it is probably sensible to find out why it fails, but this still doesn't answer the actual question. – GarethD Sep 4 '13 at 18:15
    
As stated above, this won't work in this specific instance. – MikeM Sep 4 '13 at 22:35

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