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I have several Windows 2003 web servers running ColdFusion 8 wherein the ColdFusion Administrator Application is running as its own IIS website accessible only via 127.0.0.1 (localhost).

Is there any need for a password in the application if the only users with remote access to the server are Administrators?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Felix Yan, Lipis, Uwe Keim, Guntram Blohm, devnull Mar 2 '14 at 10:07

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Keep in mind that a password for CF Administrator does not only secure the CF Administrator itself, but the Admin API - which can be exploited in a manner of ways without direct access to the server. Bottom line...always use a password for Cf Admin....always. And, on production machines, you should change the default user from 'admin' to something else. –  Scott Stroz Sep 5 '13 at 12:40
    
@ScottStroz Excellent point. That pretty much seals the deal for me. –  Eric Belair Sep 5 '13 at 15:00

1 Answer 1

One could argue that you don't need one. If a hacker can remote into the server they can just as easily delete the IIS Web site before doing anything via the ColdFusion Administrator. That said, you may want to play it safe and have a password just in case the ColdFusion Administrator does leak to the outside world.

You can always run HackMyCF.com against your site to be certain the CF Admin is indeed locked down. If you get the message "Your scanner says our ColdFusion Administrator is publicly accessible" then it may be worth following the advice outlined here. http://www.petefreitag.com/item/750.cfm

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In my view I can never really think of a reason NOT to use a password. –  Mark A Kruger Sep 4 '13 at 22:30

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