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I have class, all of the fields in which have to be when an create object. My solution:

class MyClass
{
    private string Field1;
    private int Field2;

    public MyClass(string Field1, int Field2)
    {
        this.Field1 = Field1;
        this.Field2 = Field2;
    }
}

But the fields may be greater than 2, the code looks dirty. Is there a more elegant method?

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3  
Why is it dirty? What's wrong with it? –  Erik A. Brandstadmoen Sep 4 '13 at 19:58
1  
To avoid naming conflict I suggest to use "_"(underscore) before the fields. –  Dilshod Sep 4 '13 at 20:02
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Passing fields that are required to constructors should be fine. Your code doesn't look dirty yet, but if it started to grow say 10 required fields, then it is better to create an object that contains all the required fields and then use that object when creating the object (Constructor).

Right now this is not dirty

class MyClass
{
    private string Field1;
    private int Field2;

    public MyClass(string Field1, int Field2)
    {
        this.Field1 = Field1;
        this.Field2 = Field2;
    }
}

If it became like this

class MyClass
{
    private string Field1;
    private int Field2;

    public MyClass(string Field1, int Field2, int Field3, int Field4, int Field5, int Field6, int Field7, int Field8, int Field9, int Field10)
    {
        this.Field1 = Field1;
        this.Field2 = Field2;
        //Set them
    }
}

Then it is better to have this

    class RequiredFields
{
    //All required fields
}

class MyClass
{
    private string Field1;
    private int Field2;

    public MyClass(RequiredFields requiredFields)
    {
        this.Field1 = requiredFields.Field1;
        this.Field2 = requiredFields.Field2;
        //Set them
    }
}
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1  
Yes, it's a better solution: a few fields can be combined into a single structure –  user2058005 Sep 4 '13 at 20:12
    
big cost - create structure for replace parameters –  progpow Sep 4 '13 at 21:01
    
That depends on his scenario if the fields are gonna be immutable, sure structure. Structs consume less heap memory but they take longer to copy than a reference copy. And only him can determine what is more feasible here. Maybe class, maybe struct. As a rule of thumb: if the object is (1) small, (2) logically an immutable value, and (3) there's a lot of them then I'd consider making it a struct. Otherwise I'd stick with a reference type. –  lll Sep 4 '13 at 21:13
    
And in what way does creating reference types (classes) a big cost? It only consumes LESS HEAP MEMORY vs Class. :) –  lll Sep 4 '13 at 21:14
    
At case with new structure you can`t understand which fields default and which not default. –  progpow Sep 5 '13 at 7:02
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There's really no other way to ensure the user provides a value for each and every field, but you could provide a default value yourself.

For example, you can provide an alternate constructor which constructs an object with certain default field values like this:

public MyClass() : this(string.Empty, -1)
{
}

public MyClass(string Field1, int Field2)
{
    this.Field1 = Field1;
    this.Field2 = Field2;
}

Or alternatively:

public MyClass(string Field1 = "", int Field2 = -1)
{
    this.Field1 = Field1;
    this.Field2 = Field2;
}
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Can use System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.RequiredAttribute

[Required]
public string Field1{ get; set; }
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You could use properties with setters rather than fields, and then have an IsValid() method to check that the object has been 'filled in' fully before it's used. However, if you are going to be setting all the values at the same time in code, that's not going to look any tidier.

With long constructor parameter lists, Named Arguments can help the call more readable.

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You could just have something like this and then reference the Object whenever you're trying to access the fields in it.

class MyClass
{
    private MyObject Test;

    public MyClass(MyObject Test)
    {
        this.Test = Test;
    }


}
class MyObject
{
    private string Field1;
    private int Field2;

    // Constructor / methods to set up fields
}
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I think you need private contructor, factory method and named parameters, for example:

class MyClass
{
    private string Field1;
    private int Field2;

    private MyClass()
    {

    }
    public MyClass GetMyClassInstance(string Field1=string.Empty, int Field2=-1)
    {
        this.Field1 = Field1;
        this.Field2 = Field2;
    }
}

Now you can add any count of parameters to create object of MyClass.

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This is a code smell. If he happens to have more than 2 required fields with unnecessary default values and the requirement change especially for the default values, its tedious to update the code and defining optional parameters here is not a solution. It just adds more complexity when reading the code in the future. –  lll Sep 4 '13 at 21:16
    
Oh, and adding a private constructor is useless. If you are going to create objects using factory methods/named parameters, might as well create a factory class to instantiate the MyClass object. :) –  lll Sep 4 '13 at 21:17
    
Not needed at this case create factory class. Factory method - all solve. If you need create object with not default fields - it`s other logic and then you need change signature this method or add new method. At case with new structure you can`t understand which fields default and which not default. I think create new class for this case is not good. –  progpow Sep 5 '13 at 7:01
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