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I have the following c#/c code, where I am doing stuff in a C dll. Am using pinvoke/marshal as the black magic that enables me to dynamically allocate/free stuff in the dll, without c# code knowing anything untoward is going on.

In this snippet, you will see that I am using 2 different ways to alloc/use/free an array of doubles. My question is, what does the "MarshalAs(UnmanagedType..." line do, because both incantations (ie, using or not using the MarshalAs statement) work fine? I should add that I have a poor understanding of C, even less understanding of C#, and I understand the whole pinvoke/marshal about as well as I understand supersymmetric quantum mechanics.

 [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
    public class row
    {
            public int a;

            [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst = 12)]
            IntPtr[] b;

           IntPtr [] c; 
    } 

    // c code
struct row
{
    int a;
    double *b;
    double *c;
}

void fooe(void)
{
      row.b[4] = (double *) malloc(54000);
      row.c[4] = (double *) malloc(54000);
      free(row.b[4]);
      free(row.c[4]);
}
share|improve this question
1  
It changes the marshaling for a field. Using ByValArray is not correct, the field is a double* and not a double[]. Marshaling structures with pointers is a difficult problem, there's a nasty memory ownership issue. Anything you malloc() has to be free()d by your code, the pinvoke marshaller cannot do it for you. –  Hans Passant Sep 4 '13 at 22:30
    
So are you saying that if I delete the "MarshalAs" statement, I won't encounter any nasty memory ownership issues? And of course the C code will take care of the free(). I edited my post. –  user994179 Sep 4 '13 at 22:41
    
From what I can see from this question, and your previous one, you are floundering hopelessly with your understanding of pointers and p/invoke. If you want my advice, I think you should ask a much more basic question about your specific problem. Instead of asking "do these two structures match?" you should ask "I want to do X, how do I go about doing it?" –  David Heffernan Sep 5 '13 at 8:19
    
Good idea. I will try that in a new question. –  user994179 Sep 5 '13 at 23:01

1 Answer 1

up vote -1 down vote accepted

This particular use of ByValArray changes everything.

First, let's consider the without ByValArray case. Here the array is marshalled as a pointer to the first element. The matching C struct is

struct row
{
    int a;
    void* *b; // more likely you would use a typed pointer
    void* *c;
}

No for the case where you use ByValArray. Here the array is marshalled inline and the equivalent C struct is:

struct row
{
    int a;
    void* b[12];
    void* *c;
}

These two versions are very different.

I also wonder if you really meant to use IntPtr[] in the C# code. Did you perhaps really mean to write double[]? So, perhaps you actually meant:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public class row
{
    public int a;
    double[] b;
    double[] c; 
} 

In which case the matching C struct would be:

struct row
{
    int a;
    double *b;
    double *c;
}

I've no idea what is meant by the fooe function, but it makes no sense at all and does not compile. It looks like you are trying to assign a pointer to a double which is quite meaningless.

share|improve this answer
    
No, "double[] b;" is completely different. That only declares an array of doubles, which is entirely different than an array of double pointers. It is one of the subtle, but important differences in C. There is a good explanation of this here: cs.bu.edu/teaching/cpp/string/array-vs-ptr –  user994179 Sep 5 '13 at 23:06
    
Again, a double* is not the same as a double. Here is a good, easy to understand introduction to pointers in C: pw1.netcom.com/~tjensen/ptr/pointers.htm Pointers are a crucial concept in understanding C, and you will find mastering them is very helpful in eventually going on to other aspects of C. Hope this helps. –  user994179 Sep 6 '13 at 6:50
    
I never said they were the same. You did exactly that in the code in this question when you tried to assign a double* to a double. Look in fooe to see what I mean: b[4] has type double. Certainly, once I mastered pointers I found programming much easier. –  David Heffernan Sep 6 '13 at 7:13

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