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I'm working in Rails 3 and have a table with multiple child tables, e.g.

class Foo < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :things
  has_many :items
  has_many :widgets
end

class Thing < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :foo
end

class Item < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :foo
end

class Widget < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :foo
end

Is there a simple way for me to check to if a given Foo has a child record in one or more of the tables? Basically, is there a better way to do this:

if !foo.things.empty? or !foo.items.empty? or !foo.widgets.empty?
  puts "This foo is in use!"
emd
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5 Answers 5

Well, I think you're on the right track, but maybe just put that as a method in your Foo model

class Foo < ActiveRecord::Base
  def children?
    things.any? || items.any? || widgets.any?
  end
end

Then just say, Foo.first.children? and get true if the Foo instance has any children.

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1  
I'd use any?, because present? has an unnecessary set of checks for string emptiness, and also unnecessarily checks if [] is nil. Note: foo.things will always return an array, albeit sometimes an empty one. –  varatis Sep 4 '13 at 22:18
    
Oh cool. And slightly shorter. I will update my answer –  Abram Sep 4 '13 at 22:29
    
@veritas you continue to be wrong - I don't think you're understanding active record collections completely. They don't eagerly load in all cases. foo.things will not always return an array. In the case of any? or exists? it will not load the ruby objects. any? does a count and compares with zero which is slower than exists? which just looks for the id in the database. –  Swards Sep 5 '13 at 17:41
    
@Swards If foo.things does not return an array, you've set up your AR relationships wrong, straight and simple. I encourage you to look at my updated answer. –  varatis Sep 5 '13 at 19:17
    
You're just not understanding something here, or glancing over my answers, or something. Take a look at my answer, and see that I'm actually quite right. –  varatis Sep 5 '13 at 19:32

This is what any? is for.

class Foo < ActiveRecord::Base
  def children?
    things.any? || items.any? || widgets.any?
  end
end

Since this has become a topic of contention, I present to you:

> foo = Foo.last
Foo Load (0.6ms)  SELECT "foos"......
> foo.items
Item Load (0.9ms)  SELECT "items".*.......
> foo.items.any?
=> true #OH, WHAT's that? NO SQL CALLS? GEE WILLICKERS
> foo.items.exists?
Item Exists (0.5ms) #Hmmmmmm....
=> true

The point here is that under any circumstances, exists makes a DB call, where as any? will not, if spaces is always loaded into memory. Now as I said, many times, the importance is not the efficiency of the DB call (AND YES, the SQL call exists? makes is more efficient), but the fact that any? won't necessarily make a call to the DB, which is a HUGE advantage. Look for yourself:

[20] pry(main)> Benchmark.measure { foo.item.exists? }
  Item Exists (0.5ms)  SELECT 1 AS one FROM "items" ...
=> #<Benchmark::Tms:0x007fc1f28a8638
 @cstime=0.0,
 @cutime=0.0,
 @label="",
 @real=0.002927,
 @stime=0.0,
 @total=0.00999999999999801,
 @utime=0.00999999999999801>
[21] pry(main)> Benchmark.measure { foo.items.any? }
=> #<Benchmark::Tms:0x007fc1f29d1aa0
 @cstime=0.0,
 @cutime=0.0,
 @label="",
 @real=7.6e-05,
 @stime=0.0,
 @total=0.0,
 @utime=0.0>

For a more concise timing, look at this:

> Benchmark.measure { 1000.times {foo.items.exists?} }.total
=> 2.5299999999999994
> Benchmark.measure { 1000.times {foo.items.any?} }.total
=> 0.0

Now as I said, many times, it depends on circumstance -- you could have many circumstances where these items aren't loaded into memory, but many times, they are. Choose which one works best for you depending on how you're calling it.

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+1 for GEE WILLICKERS –  Abram Sep 5 '13 at 20:34
    
The OP is not going to preload the collection, then test for existence. –  Swards Sep 5 '13 at 21:04
    
Yep, what I've been saying all along. –  varatis Sep 5 '13 at 21:43
    
Then why preload in the benchmark? –  Swards Sep 5 '13 at 22:14
    
Oh nvm, I thought you said IF the OP is not going to preload.... OP never specified, it very well could be preloaded depending on the situation. Anything that involves includes statements, etc. –  varatis Sep 5 '13 at 23:03

This should work for any given model.

class Foo < ActiveRecord::Base
  def children?
    has_associated_records = self.class.reflect_on_all_associations.map { |a| self.send(a.name).any? }
    has_associated_records.include?(true)
  end
end
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You could subclass Thing Item and Widget. Or add a polymorphic join table to keep track of it. Not ideal, I know.

You could at least do this, so it would read a little better.

if foo.things.exists? || foo.items.exists? || foo.widgets.exists?
  puts "This foo is in use!"
end

'empty?' uses 'exists?' behind the scenes, I believe.

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This is wrong. Use any? instead of exists? –  varatis Sep 4 '13 at 22:16
    
exists? will select '1', any? will do a select count(*). any? is a slower in my tests. –  Swards Sep 4 '13 at 22:20
    
Not so fast. If any things, items, or widgets are loaded into memory, exists? still performs a query for each of these. any? does not. It depends on the use case, but given OP's question, it's likely these models will be loaded into memory and thus any? will be more efficient. –  varatis Sep 4 '13 at 22:25
    
They aren't loaded into memory with exists. –  Swards Sep 4 '13 at 22:41
    
But the important part is that you'd have to make >=1 calls to the database with exists?, whereas with any?, you could make potentially 0 calls, and usually much less than exists (as I said, depends on the situation). Calls to the database are a lot, lot slower than to memory. –  varatis Sep 5 '13 at 3:31

Suppose all the associations are loaded into memory:

class Foo < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :things
  has_many :items
  has_many :widgets

  def in_use?
    [things, items, widgets].flatten.any?
  end
end

Edit

I just realized that this is wrong: each association (even if still loaded into memory) will be loaded which isn't good.

things.any? || items.any? || widgets.any?

is more correct and has been proposed before me.

share|improve this answer
    
actually it has! –  Abram Sep 4 '13 at 22:51

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