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I was struggling to understand why this simple CSS class selector was not being picked by my HTML element.

.label-hi :before {
    color:green;
    content: "Hi ! ";
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The space between simple selectors is a descendant combinator in CSS. If it were two ordinary selectors separated with space, it would mean 'element matching the second selector, placed anywhere inside the element matching the first selector'. Since the second selector is a pseudo element, the whole selector is equivalent to .label-hi *:before, potentially inserting something into any element inside the element with class label-hi.

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1  
Yeah there's no hover. But the "descendant combinator" point still applies. With the space, we're selecting a child of .label-hi and putting stuff before it. jsfiddle.net/GtTcn/4 –  showdev Sep 4 '13 at 22:20
1  
Please edit your answer accordingly for future reference. –  Hugo Hilário Sep 4 '13 at 22:24
1  
Sorry for such a stupid mistake! I've edited the answer. –  Ilya Streltsyn Sep 4 '13 at 22:37
    
Fantastic; my original comment deleted (as will this be, momentarily). –  David Thomas Sep 5 '13 at 10:52

So I realized that for this specific selectors I cannot have any space between the class name and the : This means that removing the empty space my CSS class is picked :

.label-hi:before {
    color:green;
    content: "Hi ! ";
}

In regular classes that space does not make any difference.

Sample here : http://jsfiddle.net/GtTcn/

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5  
The space, in CSS, is always important as it defines an ancestor-descendant relationship. If you add a child element, or multiple descendants to the label you'll see this. –  David Thomas Sep 4 '13 at 22:10

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