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Is there a way to embed the last command's elapsed wall time in a Bash prompt? I'm hoping for something that would look like this:

[last: 0s][/my/dir]$ sleep 10
[last: 10s][/my/dir]$

Background

I often run long data-crunching jobs and it's useful to know how long they've taken so I can estimate how long it will take for future jobs. For very regular tasks, I go ahead and record this information rigorously using appropriate logging techniques. For less-formal tasks, I'll just prepend the command with time.

It would be nice to automatically time every single interactive command and have the timing information printed in a few characters rather than 3 lines.

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1  
This is a good question for Unix/Linux Stackexchange. – Flimm Jul 3 '13 at 9:48
    
But I would have never found it there, nor been able to award a bounty to the answerer. :( – Theodore R. Smith Aug 8 '13 at 18:26
1  
@Flimm It's been reasked there already: Forcing an 'added' alias to every command Anyway this question is too old to be migrated. – Gilles Nov 19 '13 at 20:36
up vote 10 down vote accepted

You could utilize this zsh-borrowed hook for bash: http://www.twistedmatrix.com/users/glyph/preexec.bash.txt

Timing done with this hook (Mac OS X): Use Growl to monitor long-running shell commands

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1  
Here's another look at using Bash's debug hook in a similar manner: davidpashley.com/articles/xterm-titles-with-bash.html from fellow member David Pashley: serverfault.com/users/7342/david-pashley – Dennis Williamson Dec 7 '09 at 21:19
    
The hook was just what I was looking for (and the growl link is a nice quick usage example). Thanks! – Mr Fooz Dec 7 '09 at 21:31

This is minimal stand-alone code to achieve what you want:

function timer_start {
  timer=${timer:-$SECONDS}
}

function timer_stop {
  timer_show=$(($SECONDS - $timer))
  unset timer
}

trap 'timer_start' DEBUG
PROMPT_COMMAND=timer_stop

PS1='[last: ${timer_show}s][\w]$ '
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - have added a suggestion for the issue you identified. – martin clayton Dec 7 '09 at 21:27
    
Thanks Martin. I updated my answer to give a greatly improved solution taking advantage of the DEBUG trap. – Ville Laurikari Dec 8 '09 at 10:58
3  
+1 You just totally revolutionized my life. – Theodore R. Smith Jul 28 '12 at 7:54
8  
After implementing this on the 5th system and using literally tens of thousands of times over the last two years, I want to thank you again. It has revolutionized my life ;-) – Theodore R. Smith Aug 8 '13 at 18:37
2  
Awesome. I wanted the time displayed only for "slow" commands, and I wanted a bell on those so I would be automatically alerted to completion of a slow command. So: PS1='$([ $timer_show -gt 10 ] && echo -e "\a[${timer_show}s]")[\w]$ ' – retracile Feb 6 '14 at 15:37

Another very minimal approach is:

trap 'SECONDS=0' DEBUG
export PS1='your_normal_prompt_here ($SECONDS) # '

This shows the number of seconds since the last simple command was started. The counter is not reset if you simply hit Enter without entering a command -- which can be handy when you just want to see how long the terminal has been up since you last did anything in it. It works fine for me in Red Hat and Ubuntu. It did NOT work for me under Cygwin, but I'm not sure if that's a bug or just a limitation of trying to run Bash under Windows.

One possible drawback to this approach is that you keep resetting SECONDS, but if you truly need to preserve SECONDS as the number of seconds since initial shell invocation, you can create your own variable for the PS1 counter instead of using SECONDS directly. Another possible drawback is that a large seconds value such as "999999" might be be better displayed as days+hours+minutes+seconds, but it's easy to add a simple filter such as:

seconds2days() { # convert integer seconds to Ddays,HH:MM:SS
  printf "%ddays,%02d:%02d:%02d" $(((($1/60)/60)/24)) \
  $(((($1/60)/60)%24)) $((($1/60)%60)) $(($1%60)) |
  sed 's/^1days/1day/;s/^0days,\(00:\)*//;s/^0//' ; }
trap 'SECONDS=0' DEBUG
PS1='other_prompt_stuff_here ($(seconds2days $SECONDS)) # '

This translates "999999" into "11days,13:46:39". The sed at the end changes "1days" to "1day", and trims off empty leading values such as "0days,00:". Adjust to taste.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice. I picked this one. thanks. – FractalSpace Nov 23 '12 at 18:54
    
I like how this answer looks, but unfortunately it doesn't seem to work for me, at least not with 4.2.25(1)-release on Ubuntu 12.04. Once you set SECONDS to 0, it's always 0. – pioto May 2 '13 at 16:30
    
The problem I have with this is that there is a PROMPT_COMMAND that gets fired after every command, and that sends the DEBUG signal as well, which resets the timer - so every time the prompt comes up, the timer was started 0 seconds ago. – PJSCopeland Apr 12 at 22:50

If you hadn't set up any of the other answers before you kicked off your long-running job and you just want to know how long the job took, you can do the simple

$ HISTTIMEFORMAT="%s " history 2

and it will reply with something like

  654  1278611022 gvn up
  655  1278611714 HISTTIMEFORMAT="%s " history 2

and you can then just visually subtract the two timestamps (anybody know how to capture the output of the shell builtin history command?)

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What do you mean, "how to capture the output"? You can just pipe it, use command substitution, cut it, grep it, awk it, perl it, sed it... Technologic. – Camilo Martin Jun 28 '14 at 14:40

Using your replies and some other threads, I wrote this prompt which I want to share with you. I took a screenshot in wich you can see :

  • White : Last return code
  • Green and tick mark means success (return code was 0)
  • Red and cross mark means error (return code was >0)
  • (Green or Red) : Last command execution time in parenthesis
  • (Green or Red) : Current date time (\t)
  • (Green if not root, Red if root) : the logged username
  • (Green) : the server name
  • (Blue) : the pwd directory and the usual $

Custom prompt

Here is the code to put in your ~/.bashrc file :

function timer_now {
    date +%s%N
}

function timer_start {
    timer_start=${timer_start:-$(timer_now)}
}

function timer_stop {
    local delta_us=$((($(timer_now) - $timer_start) / 1000))
    local us=$((delta_us % 1000))
    local ms=$(((delta_us / 1000) % 1000))
    local s=$(((delta_us / 1000000) % 60))
    local m=$(((delta_us / 60000000) % 60))
    local h=$((delta_us / 3600000000))
    # Goal: always show around 3 digits of accuracy
    if ((h > 0)); then timer_show=${h}h${m}m
    elif ((m > 0)); then timer_show=${m}m${s}s
    elif ((s >= 10)); then timer_show=${s}.$((ms / 100))s
    elif ((s > 0)); then timer_show=${s}.$(printf %03d $ms)s
    elif ((ms >= 100)); then timer_show=${ms}ms
    elif ((ms > 0)); then timer_show=${ms}.$((us / 100))ms
    else timer_show=${us}us
    fi
    unset timer_start
}


set_prompt () {
    Last_Command=$? # Must come first!
    Blue='\[\e[01;34m\]'
    White='\[\e[01;37m\]'
    Red='\[\e[01;31m\]'
    Green='\[\e[01;32m\]'
    Reset='\[\e[00m\]'
    FancyX='\342\234\227'
    Checkmark='\342\234\223'


    # Add a bright white exit status for the last command
    PS1="$White\$? "
    # If it was successful, print a green check mark. Otherwise, print
    # a red X.
    if [[ $Last_Command == 0 ]]; then
        PS1+="$Green$Checkmark "
    else
        PS1+="$Red$FancyX "
    fi

    # Add the ellapsed time and current date
    timer_stop
    PS1+="($timer_show) \t "

    # If root, just print the host in red. Otherwise, print the current user
    # and host in green.
    if [[ $EUID == 0 ]]; then
        PS1+="$Red\\u$Green@\\h "
    else
        PS1+="$Green\\u@\\h "
    fi
    # Print the working directory and prompt marker in blue, and reset
    # the text color to the default.
    PS1+="$Blue\\w \\\$$Reset "
}

trap 'timer_start' DEBUG
PROMPT_COMMAND='set_prompt'
share|improve this answer
    
There is an adjustment on MACOSX : Remove the %N after the date command – Nicolas Thery Feb 29 at 9:45

I took the answer from Ville Laurikari and improved it using the time command to show sub-second accuracy:

function timer_now {
  date +%s%N
}

function timer_start {
  timer_start=${timer_start:-$(timer_now)}
}

function timer_stop {
  local delta_us=$((($(timer_now) - $timer_start) / 1000))
  local us=$((delta_us % 1000))
  local ms=$(((delta_us / 1000) % 1000))
  local s=$(((delta_us / 1000000) % 60))
  local m=$(((delta_us / 60000000) % 60))
  local h=$((delta_us / 3600000000))
  # Goal: always show around 3 digits of accuracy
  if ((h > 0)); then timer_show=${h}h${m}m
  elif ((m > 0)); then timer_show=${m}m${s}s
  elif ((s >= 10)); then timer_show=${s}.$((ms / 100))s
  elif ((s > 0)); then timer_show=${s}.$(printf %03d $ms)s
  elif ((ms >= 100)); then timer_show=${ms}ms
  elif ((ms > 0)); then timer_show=${ms}.$((us / 100))ms
  else timer_show=${us}us
  fi
  unset timer_start
}

trap 'timer_start' DEBUG
PROMPT_COMMAND=timer_stop

PS1='[last: ${timer_show}][\w]$ '

Of course this requires a process to be started, so it's less efficient, but still fast enough that you wouldn't notice.

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I found that trap ... DEBUG was running every time $PROMPT_COMMAND was called, resetting the timer, and therefore always returning 0.

However, I found that history records times, and I tapped into these to get my answer:

HISTTIMEFORMAT='%s '
PROMPT_COMMAND="
  START=\$(history 1 | cut -f5 -d' ');
  NOW=\$(date +%s);
  ELAPSED=\$[NOW-START];
  $PROMPT_COMMAND"
PS1="\$ELAPSED $PS1"

It's not perfect though:

  • If history doesn't register the command (e.g. repeated or ignored commands), the start time will be wrong.
  • Multi-line commands don't get the date extracted properly from history.
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Will putting a \t in PS1 work for you?

It does not give the elapsed time but it should be easy enough to subtract the times when necessary.

$ export PS1='[\t] [\w]\$ '
[14:22:30] [/bin]$ sleep 10
[14:22:42] [/bin]$


Following the OP's comment that he is already using \t. If you can use tcsh instead of bash, you can set the time variable.

/bin 1 > set time = 0
/bin 2 > sleep 10
0.015u 0.046s 0:10.09 0.4%      0+0k 0+0io 2570pf+0w
/bin 3 >

You can change the format of the printing to be less ugly (se the tcsh man page).

/bin 4 > set time = ( 0 "last: %E" )
/bin 5 > sleep 10
last: 0:10.09
/bin 6 >

I do not know of a similar facility in bash

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1  
At the moment, I am in fact using \t, and it's often sufficient. Unfortunately, when I'm running long commands non-interactively there are gaps of time from when a previous command completes and I interactively start a new one. If I press <ENTER> just before running a new command it works, but I don't always remember to do so, so I'd like to automatically capture elapsed time. – Mr Fooz Dec 7 '09 at 20:28

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