Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code snippet:

struct T {
    T(const T&) = default;
    T(const S &);
};

struct S {
    operator T();
};

int main() {
    S s;
    T t = s; // copy-initialization of class type
    return 0;
}

My question is why the compiler prefers S::operator T() for the initialization of t rather than reporting an error that the initialization is ambigious. In my opinion the following happens (correct me if i am wrong):

  • t is copy-initialized with an lvalue of type S
  • S is not T and S is also not a subclass of T, so S and T are unrelated
  • because of the fact that the variable t is copy-initialized and the fact that the types S and T are unrelated, the compiler tries to find user-defined-conversion sequences to do the initialization.
  • overload resolution is responsible for selecting the best user-defined-conversion which can be either a converting constructor of T or the conversion function of S
  • the implicite conversion sequence for the constructor T::T(const S&) from the argument s is the identity conversion because the lvalue s can be bound directly to this lvalue reference
  • the implicite conversion sequence for the conversion function S::operator T() from the argument s is also the identity conversion, because the implicit object parameter is S&

Both the constructor and the conversion function return a prvalue of type T which can be used to direct-initialize the variable t. That means that the second standard conversion sequence of both user-defined-conversion sequences is the identity conversion.

This would mean that both user-defined-conversion sequences are equally good. Or is there a special rule which prefers the conversion functions?

I was reading the following rules in the c++11 standard:

The initialization that occurs in the form T x = a; as well as in argument passing, function return, throwing an exception (15.1), handling an exception (15.3), and aggregate member initialization (8.5.1) is called copy-initialization.

The semantics of initializers are as follows...If the destination type is a (possibly cv-qualified) class type: If the initialization is direct-initialization, or if it is copy-initialization where the cv-unqualified version of the source type is the same class as, or a derived class of, the class of the destination, constructors are considered.... Otherwise (i.e., for the remaining copy-initialization cases), user-defined conversion sequences that can convert from the source type to the destination type or (when a conversion function is used) to a derived class thereof are enumerated as described in 13.3.1.4, and the best one is chosen through overload resolution (13.3)

User-defined conversion sequence U1 is a better conversion sequence than another user defined conversion sequence U2 if they contain the same user-defined conversion function or constructor and if the second standard conversion sequence of U1 is better than the second standard conversion sequence of U2

Maybe i am making false assumptions. I hope you can help me!

Regards, Kevin

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

The conversion from S using the conversion operator is better than the conversion to T taking an S const as argument. If you make s an S const, the constructor is preferred: Your identity operation in one case, indeed, is an identity operation, in the other case it isn't. If you make the conversion operator of S a const member, you get an ambiguity. Below is a test program demonstrating all cases:

struct S;
struct T {
    T(const T&) = default;
    T(const S &);
};

struct S {
    S(); // needed to allow creation of a const object
#ifdef AMBIGUOUS
    operator T() const;
#else
    operator T();
#endif
};

int main() {
#ifdef CONST
    S const s;
#else
    S s;
#endif
    T t = s; // copy-initialization of class type
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your example. I think i found the rule which clarifies this. –  Xtrmk3v0r Sep 4 '13 at 23:25

I think i found the rule which clarifies this:

13.3.3.2: ... S1 and S2 are reference bindings (8.5.3), and the types to which the references refer are the same type except for top-level cv-qualifiers, and the type to which the reference initialized by S2 refers is more cv-qualified than the type to which the reference initialized by S1 refers.

In the member function S::operator T() the implicit object parameter has type S& which is directly bound to the lvalue s of type S. In the constructor T::T(const S&) the parameter is directly bound to the lvalue s of type S but this reference binding is more cv-qualified than in the operator function, so the operator function is preferred by overload resolution.

Do you agree with this?

share|improve this answer
    
You need to do a little more work to show that the implicit object parameter is a reference binding. There is no ref-qualifier after operator T(). But I think you'll find the connection in the discussion of implicit object parameters in the Overloading clause. –  Andrew Tomazos Sep 5 '13 at 19:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.