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I have two classes, one in which I have the <T extends Comparable<T> in the class header iteslf as class MaximumTest2 <T extends Comparable<T>> and another in which I have public class MaximumTest but the method extends Comparable as you can see in the code below.

  1. In what way are the implementations different and is one better than other. btw , the way both classes above do the same thing.

    class MaximumTest2 <T extends Comparable<T>>
    {
       // determines the largest of three Comparable objects
       public  T  maximum(T x, T y, T z) // cant make it static but why??
       {                      
          T max = x; // assume x is initially the largest       
          if ( y.compareTo( max ) > 0 ){
             max = y; // y is the largest so far
          }
          if ( z.compareTo( max ) > 0 ){
             max = z; // z is the largest now                 
          }
          return max; // returns the largest object   
       }
    }
    public class MaximumTest
    {
       // determines the largest of three Comparable objects
       public static <T extends Comparable<T>> T maximum(T x, T y, T z)
       {                      
          T max = x; // assume x is initially the largest       
          if ( y.compareTo( max ) > 0 ){
             max = y; // y is the largest so far
          }
          if ( z.compareTo( max ) > 0 ){
             max = z; // z is the largest now                 
          }
          return max; // returns the largest object   
       }
       public static void main( String args[] )
       {
           MaximumTest2 test2 = new MaximumTest2();
           System.out.println(test2.maximum(9, 11, 5));
    
          System.out.printf( "Max of %d, %d and %d is %d\n\n", 
                       3, 4, 5, maximum( 3, 4, 5 ) );
    
          System.out.printf( "Maxm of %.1f,%.1f and %.1f is %.1f\n\n",
                       6.6, 8.8, 7.7, maximum( 6.6, 8.8, 7.7 ) );
    
          System.out.printf( "Max of %s, %s and %s is %s\n","pear",
             "apple", "orange", maximum( "pear", "apple", "orange" ) );
       }
    

    }

    1. when I try to make the method public T maximum(T x, T y, T z) static, I get the following error in Eclispe: cannot make a static reference to a non-static type T. I do not understand what this means? Can I not make it static?
  2. Lastly, what is phrase exactly means <T extends Comparable<T>?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, your first declaration makes MaximumTest generic whereas the second does not; that's a big difference from a programming standpoint (although when all is said and done and your code is compiled, the difference is erased -- that's why you can't declare a generic class and a non-generic class with the same name).

cant make it static but why??

Sure you can; you just need to declare the type parameter T in the method signature as you do in your second declaration:

public static <T extends Comparable<T>> T maximum(T x, T y, T z)

static methods can know nothing about the type parameter of the instance, by definition.

Lastly, what is phrase exactly means <T extends Comparable<T>>

In plain terms, it means T must be a type such that T instances are comparable to other T instances. Specifically, T must implement the Comparable interface and consequently support the compareTo() method, the mechanism through which the comparing is done.

share|improve this answer
    
<T extends Comparable<T>> declaring this again in the method (when I have declared is class header) is redundant correct? then what is the point of declaring in class header – brain storm Sep 4 '13 at 23:43
1  
@user1988876 It's not redundant; they're different Ts, one belongs to the instance (the one in the class declaration) and one belongs to the static method. Static methods don't have access to the type parameters of the class they're defined in. – arshajii Sep 4 '13 at 23:44
    
had been non-generic, I would have had public static int maximum(int x, int y , int z) and extrapolating that to generics, I should have had public static T maximum(T x, T y, T z). T here refers to some element type right. It could be int or float – brain storm Sep 4 '13 at 23:48
    
@user1988876 It can't be a primitive, it would have to be the corresponding wrapper class. – arshajii Sep 4 '13 at 23:50
    
sorry, T cannot be int or float but Integer or Float – brain storm Sep 4 '13 at 23:50

Static members of a class (such as static methods) do not inherit the class's type parameters. So with MaximumTest2, if you were to make maximum static, then it wouldn't know what T is. Your only option would be to make the method itself generic, but then you already did that with your MaximumTest class and its static maximum method.

When you say <T extends Comparable<T>>, you declare a generic type parameter with an upper bound. T must be Comparable, and the specific type parameter for Comparable must be the same T. For example, a Foo class that you'd like to use as T must implement Comparable<Foo>.

share|improve this answer
    
'and the specific type parameter for Comparable must be the same T' ...It can also be a subclass. – mike Sep 4 '13 at 23:38
3  
@mike Not necessarily. If you have class Foo that implements Comparable<Foo>, and you have class Bar that extends Foo, then Bar is Comparable<Foo>, not Comparable<Bar>, and you'll get inferred type 'Bar' for type parameter 'T' is not within its bound; should implement 'java.lang.Comparable<Bar>' if you pass Bars to maximum. The solution here is to modify the upper bound: <T extends Comparable<? super T>>. – rgettman Sep 4 '13 at 23:47

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