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Let me explain my problem with a dummy situation. Let's consider the following code :

var counter = 0;    
function increase(){
    if(counter < 10){
        counter++;
        setTimeout(increase, 100);
    }
}

Now, the idea is to display the counter value once the increase() function has finished its job. Let's try this :

increase();
alert(counter);

As you probably know, it doesn't work. The alert() call displays 1, not 10. I would like to display the value of counter once the function has entierly finished its job of incrementing it.

Is there a simple way to solve my problem ?

[Note] Using a callback function is NOT an option, since I don't want increase() to know that I would like to do something after it's done (for modularity purposes). So, I'd like to AVOID something like this :

function increaseForTheKings(f){
    if(counter < 10){
        counter++;
        setTimeout(function(){ increase(f); }, 100);
    } else {
       f();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
did you notice you're calling the timer inside the function? Is that your intention? You have to consider that timing executions are asynchronous, so you should explain better so we will be able to help you. –  Lucas Maus Sep 4 '13 at 23:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The standard way to do this is with promises.

var counter = 0;
function increase(){
  var d = jQuery.Deferred();
  var doIncrease = function() {
    if(counter < 10){
        counter++;
        setTimeout(doIncrease, 100);
    } else {
      d.resolve();
    }
  };
  doIncrease();
  return d.promise();
};

increase().then(function() {
  alert(counter);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. I didn't know promises existence and they seem quite easy to use. However, I notice that the function doIncrease must itself call d.resolve(). This is a way of explicitely saying that it has finished. In my situation, this is somehow equivalent to using a callback function, since I would have to ask the function writer to satisfy some constraining requirement. But if you say that there is no external way to know when doIncrease is fully done, then this solution is fine for me. –  Backslash36 Sep 5 '13 at 0:50
    
So far as I know, there's no reliable and general way to know if any timeouts are pending (which is what you would need). You could construct a service that offered timeouts and management of timeouts, and then have increase use that service instead of setTimeout, but ultimately, you'd be building something equivalent to what we have here. –  Malvolio Sep 5 '13 at 1:25
    
Two other things: 1. yes, promises rule, and 2. there's nothing "un-modular" about allowing (but not requiring) a callback or returning a promise. They are perfectly cromulent design patterns. –  Malvolio Sep 5 '13 at 1:31
    
Thanks a lot !! –  Backslash36 Sep 5 '13 at 7:20

As far as I know, there's only so much you can do when dealing with asynchronous operations. If you want to avoid a callback, I'd say go with promises. Actually, I'd say use promises anyway :)

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