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I'm relatively new to Python and I cannot for the life of me figure out what's going on here. Python is skipping every other number when using for to loop over a list, but only after a certain number of elements in. This is part of a larger project I'm working on, but this snippet of code illustrates it.

The code works properly until 7, at which point it begins skipping every other number. I know not to edit a list I'm in the process of iterating over, so I'm avoiding that, but the for isn't even calling some of them. What do I need to do to get it to loop through each number rather than every other? Why is it doing this?

Code:

import math

i1 = 60
l1 = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 49, 53, 59]
l3 = l1

print(l1)
for a in l1:
    print(a)
    if a > math.floor(math.sqrt(i1)):
        print("REMOVED: " + str(a))
        l3.remove(a)

print(l3)

Output:

[2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 49, 53, 59]
2
3
5
7
11
REMOVED: 11
17
REMOVED: 17
23
REMOVED: 23
31
REMOVED: 31
41
REMOVED: 41
47
REMOVED: 47
53
REMOVED: 53
[2, 3, 5, 7, 13, 19, 29, 37, 43, 49, 59]
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+1 well presented question with all the detail needed to give you a clear answer (yay!) –  msw Sep 5 '13 at 1:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted
l3 = l1

Now, l3 and l1 refer to the same list. Calling remove() on one will effect the other as well. So, when you call l3.remove(a) while iterating over l1, an item in l1 (!) is removed, all the subsequent elements are shifted down, the loop iterates to the next element, and an item is consequently skipped.

For example, imagine that we're looping through the following list and we remove b:

-----------------
| a | b | c | d |
-----------------
      ^ (we're on b)

-----------------
| a |   | c | d |
-----------------
      ^ (remove b)

-------------
| a | c | d |
-------------
      ^ (shift elements down)

-------------
| a | c | d |
-------------
          ^ (step)

Notice that we skipped c.

Perhaps you meant

l3 = list(l1)  # create a new, independent list
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, yes, this is what I was thought it would do. Thank you! –  Vaindil Sep 5 '13 at 0:07
    
@StevenH Glad I could help. Don't forget to accept an answer. By the way I also added a visual to help you better understand the skipping phenomenon. –  arshajii Sep 5 '13 at 0:11
    
@arshsajii Yes, I will accept it, just have to wait before stackoverflow will let me.... Thank you, I really appreciate it! –  Vaindil Sep 5 '13 at 0:14

l3 and l1 are pointing to the same list, if you want them to be unique, use l3 = l1[:]

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really, the best way to do copying is copy.deepcopy. But since this is a list of ints, a simple shallow copy will do. –  inspectorG4dget Sep 5 '13 at 0:15
    
Even for a list of objects, deepcopy would be overkill in this case. (I was uncertain, so I tested it; if you think of lists as lists of references it is more obvious that altering the iterable of the for is bad but that altering a shallow copy should not cause any issue). –  msw Sep 5 '13 at 1:48

You don't remove elements from a collection while iterating it. l1 and l3 are referencing the same list. Perhaps what you intended is:

    l3= list(l1)

This will take a copy.

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