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How would you "save" a page somewhere (on the client), then restore it, with all its event listeners intact?

I have a sample at http://jsfiddle.net/KellyCline/Fhd55/ that demonstrates how I create a "page", save it and go to a "next" page on a button click, and then restore the first page on another button click, but now the first page's click listeners are gone.

I understand that this is due to the serialization that html() performs, so, obviously, that's what I am doing wrong, but what I'd like is a clue to doing it right.

This is the code:

    var history = [];

$(document).ready(function () {
    var page1 = $(document.createElement('div'))
        .attr({
        'id': 'Page 1'
    }).append("Page ONE text");
    var nextButton = $(document.createElement('button'));
    nextButton.append('NEXT');
    nextButton.on('click', function () {
        CreateNextPage();
    });
    page1.append(nextButton);
    $("#content").append(page1);
});

function CreateNextPage() {
    history.push( $("#content").html( ) );
    $("#content").html( 'Click Me!');
    var page1 = $(document.createElement('div'))
        .attr({
        'id': 'Page 2'
    }).append("Page TWO text");
    var nextButton = $(document.createElement('button'));
    nextButton.append('NEXT');
    nextButton.on('click', function () {
        CreateNextPage();
    });
    var prevButton = $(document.createElement('button'));
    prevButton.append('PREVIOUS');
    prevButton.on('click', function () {
        GoBack();
    });
    page1.append(nextButton);
    page1.append(prevButton);
    $("#content").append(page1);

}

function GoBack() {
    $("#content").html( history[history.length - 1]);
    history.pop( );
}

and this is the html:

Click Me!
share|improve this question

I think this is best solved via event delegation. Basically, you encapsulate content that you know you are going to refresh within a wrapper element and bind your listeners to that. The jQuery .on() method allows you to pass a selector string as a filter and will only trigger the handler if the originating element matches. Give your buttons a class or something to get a handle on them and then bind them up above. This article has some examples.

$( '#content' ).on( 'click', 'button.next', createNextPage )

for instance.

share|improve this answer

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