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The following observation arose as I was following this question about char[] and char* differences.

#include <iostream>

typedef char ar[];
typedef char* pr;
void f2(ar x, pr y)
{
    std::cout << std::is_same<decltype(x), decltype(y)>::value << '\n';
    std::cout << std::is_same<ar, pr>::value << '\n';
}

int main()
{
    char data[] = "data";
    char *ptr = data;
    f2(data,ptr);
    return 0;
}

Output ( on Apple LLVM version 4.2 (clang-425.0.28) )

1
0

Why do these report as different types, but not different decltype()s ? My suspicion is they are in fact different types due to their typedef declarations, but then why are variables reported as the same type?

share|improve this question
    
Decaying? (as function parameters) –  dyp Sep 5 '13 at 0:57
1  
(Elaborating on my comment:) The parameter types of the function are "decayed" as per [dcl.fct]/5: "After determining the type of each parameter, any parameter of type “array of T” or “function returning T” is adjusted to be “pointer to T” or “pointer to function returning T”, respectively". Therefore decltype(x) is pointer to char, not array of unknown bound of char (unlike ar). –  dyp Sep 5 '13 at 1:02
    
@DyP Thank you for the standard reference, sir. –  WhozCraig Sep 5 '13 at 4:36
    
@WhozCraig You may want to check the std::decay (at en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/types/decay). –  Red XIII Sep 5 '13 at 6:04
    
May the only question you ever asked get you to the magical 20k!!! And may I be the first to congratulate you... –  Floris Oct 26 '13 at 1:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

In C++, as in C, a parameter that's declared to be of array type is adjusted (at compile time) to be of pointer type, specifically a pointer to the array's element type.

This happens whether the array type is specified directly or via a typedef (remember that a typedef doesn't create a new type, just an alias for an existing type).

So this:

typedef char ar[];
typedef char* pr;
void f2(ar x, pr y)
{
    // ...
}

really means:

void f2(char* x, char* y)
{
    // ...
}

Another rule, also shared by C and C++, is that an expression of array type is, in most but not all contexts, implicitly converted to a pointer to the first element of the array object. Which means that if you define an array object:

char arr[10];

you can use the name of that object as an argument to a function that takes a char* parameter (which loses the bounds information).

In C, the cases where this implicit conversion doesn't happen are:

  1. When the array expression is the operand of sizeof (sizeof arr yields the size of the array, not the size of a pointer);
  2. When the array expression is the operand of unary & (&arr is a pointer-to-array, not a pointer-to-pointer); and
  3. When the array expression is a string literal used to initialize an object of array type (char s[] = "hello"; initializes s as an array, not as a pointer).

None of these cases (or the other cases that occur in C++) appear in your program, so your call:

f2(data,ptr);

passes two pointer values of type char* to f2.

Inside f2, the parameter objects x and y are both of type char*, so std::is_same<decltype(x), decltype(y)>::value is true.

But the types ar and pr are distinct. ar is an incomplete array type char[], and pr is the pointer type char*.

Which explains your program's output. The weirdness happens because the parameter x, which you defined with the array type ar, is really of type char*, which is the same type as pr.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, Keith. This was very well presented, and in-concert with Dyp's standard reference from general comment, explains precisely what is being seen. Very much appreciated. –  WhozCraig Sep 5 '13 at 4:35

The C family is pass-by-value, and the C value of an array is a pointer to its first element. When you pass an item declared to be an array to a function, what's really getting passed is that pointer, and C treats the prototype as if you declared it that way.

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I changed the code so that we could see how calling a f2 changes the type. Before the call the variables are of different type. After the call they have become same

    typedef char ar[];
typedef char* pr;
void f2(ar x, pr y)
{
    cout << is_same<decltype(x), decltype(y)>::value << '\n'; //same type
}

int main()
{
    ar data = "data";
    pr ptr = data;
    cout << is_same<decltype(data), decltype(ptr)>::value << '\n'; // different
    f2(data,ptr);
    return 0;
}

the output is 0 0 .As @jthill, @Dyp and @keith Thompson says this is because of decaying of the array to pointer.

share|improve this answer
1  
Another "visualization" of the issue: is_same<decltype(x), char[]> and is_same<ar, char[]> inside f2 (and of course is_same<decltype(x), char*>). –  dyp Sep 5 '13 at 2:12
    
Oh, and something interesting: is_same<decltype(data), ar> is also false (because ar is incomplete and [basic.types]/6 says they're different). –  dyp Sep 5 '13 at 2:15

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