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The following Perl code prints Value:0. Is there a way to fix it other than by adding a dummy key to the hash before hash reference is passed to the subroutine ?

#!/usr/bin/perl 
use warnings;
use strict;

my $Hash;

#$Hash->{Key1} = 1234;

Init($Hash);

printf("Value:%d\n",$Hash->{Key});

sub Init
{
    my ($Hash) = @_;
    $Hash->{Key}=10;
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Initialize an empty hash reference.

#!/usr/bin/perl 
use warnings;
use strict;

my $Hash = {};

Init($Hash);

printf("Value:%d\n",$Hash->{Key});

sub Init
{
    my ($Hash) = @_;
    $Hash->{Key}=10;
}
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3  
I would have voted for this if you explained why his original program didn't work. –  cjm Sep 5 '13 at 4:59
    
Thanks for the feedback. Pretty new to this so I'll keep it in mind for the future. –  Jack Bracken Sep 5 '13 at 19:05

I know that an answer has already been accepted, but I figured it was worth explaining why the program acted this way in the first place.

The hash is not created until the second line of the Init function ($Hash->{Key}=10), which automatically creates a hash and stores a reference in the $Hash scalar. This scalar is local to the function, and has nothing to do with the $Hash variable in the body of the script.

This can be changed by modifying the way that the Init function handles its arguments:

sub Init {
    my $Hash = $_[0] = {};
    $Hash->{'Key'} = 10;
}
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What is being passed to the subroutine if hash reference is not initialized ? –  Jean Sep 5 '13 at 14:33
    
@Jean It's just sending an undefined scalar. Not a reference to anything. –  AKHolland Sep 5 '13 at 15:01

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