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I just don't understand why this Yes/No loop will not work. Any suggestions? Given the input is "Y". I just want it to run the loop, then ask for Y or N again. If Y, print success, if N, print a good bye statement. What's the reason?

int main(){
    char answer;
    printf("\nWould you like to play? Enter Y or N: \n", answer);
    scanf("%c", &answer);
    printf("\n answer is %c");
    while (answer == 'Y'){
        printf("Success!");

        printf("\nDo you want to play again? Y or N: \n");
        scanf("%c", &answer);
    }
    printf("GoodBye!");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
what happens when you run it? – Keith Nicholas Sep 5 '13 at 3:20
    
you know when it asks you the question you have to type: Y<Enter> it doesn't work on keypress – Keith Nicholas Sep 5 '13 at 3:20
    
I will add "not work" means it executes the whole program and prints goodbye without giving me the chance to answer "Y" or "N" again and execute the loop again. – user2232926 Sep 5 '13 at 3:22
    
@Keith, I didnt know tht – user2232926 Sep 5 '13 at 3:23
    
can you explain? – user2232926 Sep 5 '13 at 3:24
up vote 1 down vote accepted

fixed the various issues

#include <stdio.h> 
int main(){
char answer;
printf("\nWould you like to play? Enter Y or N: \n");
scanf(" %c", &answer);
printf("\n answer is %c\n", answer);
while (answer == 'Y'){

printf("Success!");

printf("\nDo you want to play again? Y or N: \n");

scanf(" %c", &answer);
printf("\n answer is %c\n", answer);

}
printf("GoodBye!");
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot!! You got it perfect. Ive researched a while for this straight simple answer everywhere and you answered it perfectly. That damn extra space before the %c. Like I told Hao, I tried to upvote but aint got the rep yet. Sorry. Great response though! – user2232926 Sep 5 '13 at 3:46
    
you should have the rep now, and you should be able to accept the answer – Keith Nicholas Sep 5 '13 at 3:52
    
what am I supposed to make of "incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘printf’" when I compile? Program still works perfect, but are these a worry? – user2232926 Sep 5 '13 at 4:26
    
at the top, add the line #include <stdio.h> – Keith Nicholas Sep 5 '13 at 4:46
    
you will also likely need stdlib.h and string.h as you go forward.... but basically that warning says we came across printf and guessed that it is a function using our default guess, but then when we linked it, we found the real function and its different, but because I'm C, I'll just let you do that and for the most it will work out, until it doesn't, then you'll have a bug thats really hard to find, especially if you are a noob – Keith Nicholas Sep 5 '13 at 4:50

Change the second scanf to:

scanf(" %c", &answer);
//     ^

The problem is, when you enter Y and press ENTER, the new line is still in the input buffer, adding a space before %c could consume it.

share|improve this answer
    
You were right on man! I tried to upvote your answer but I need a rep of 15. lol, sorry. Thanks for the help!! – user2232926 Sep 5 '13 at 3:44
    
When I have a loop of scanf, is it always a good idea adding a blank before % ? – Lidong Guo Sep 5 '13 at 4:21
    
@LidongGuo It depends. In most situations, it's better to avoid using scanf at all, use fgets to get the whole line and sscanf to get the contents. – Yu Hao Sep 5 '13 at 4:27
    
can fgets get a single char? – user2232926 Sep 5 '13 at 4:32
    
@GetKnighted It can only get the whole line, but you can then use sscanf to get the single char. The potential problem of scanf is, the user may not input what you expect him to input, which may cause problems. – Yu Hao Sep 5 '13 at 4:36

You can reduce the repetition in your code a bit, and check the result of scanf() (as you should) by writing:

int main(void)
{
    char answer;
    printf("Would you like to play? Enter Y or N: ");
    while (scanf(" %c", &answer) == 1 && answer == 'Y')
    {
        printf("Answer is %c\n", answer);
        printf("Success!\n");
        printf("Do you want to play again? Y or N: ");
    }
    printf("GoodBye!\n");
    return 0;
}

The first printf() lost the unused argument answer; the second printf() collected the necessary second argument, answer. Except for prompts, it is generally best to end printing operations with a newline (rather than use a newline at the start). Prompts will generally be flushed by the C library before the input from stdin is read, so you don't need the newline at the end of those.

Since printf() returns the number of characters it prints, you can use it in conditions too:

int main(void)
{
    char answer;
    printf("Would you like to play? Enter Y or N: ");
    while (scanf(" %c", &answer) == 1 &&
           printf("Answer is %c\n", answer) > 0 &&
           answer == 'Y')
    {
        printf("Success!\n");
        printf("Do you want to play again? Y or N: ");
    }
    printf("GoodBye!\n");
    return 0;
}

This always echoes the answer, even if the answer was not Y and the loop exits.

share|improve this answer
    
I F****** love the tips man!! Like I said, Im a total noob. Just trying to get my feet wet. Always love a great suggestion! Thanks bro! – user2232926 Sep 5 '13 at 3:54

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