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I'm not sure if I have my syntax correct but for some reason I can't seem to call my function, my code is set up in the following way;

var MyMethod =
{
    MyFunction1: function(myData)
    {
        /// ...
        MyFunction2: ([myData]);
        return "YES";
    },

    MyFunction2: function(data)
    {
        // ...
        return 'YES';
    },
};

Is this the correct way to call the function? Function1 executes properly, but the I can't get the second function to execute with that call. I've tried just having it as MyFunction2(myData) etc as well but no luck either.

I have also thought that because my function is setup within the var, that I put function1 underneath function2 but that didn't work either.

Any idea's what I'm doing wrong here?

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1  
opening braces { is missing –  Arun Killu Sep 5 '13 at 5:48
    
Thanks - I had this in my code but missed adding it in when typing up the question –  BASmith Sep 5 '13 at 5:58
    
@BASmith A little hint for future SO questions; ALWAYS paste code in –  Phil Sep 5 '13 at 6:00
    
Yeah it was actually a copy and paste, but the MyMethod variable was much larger with more functions - when I was editing the other functions out to help with simplifying my question, I must have accidentally got rid of the bracket :-( –  BASmith Sep 5 '13 at 6:07
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
var MyMethod = {
    MyFunction1: function(myData) {
        MyMethod.MyFunction2([myData]);
        return 'YES';
    },
    MyFunction2: function(data) {
        // whatever ...
        return 'YES';
    }
};

You can potentially also use this.MyFunction2([myData]) however, execution of MyFunction1 cannot be guaranteed to be using MyMethod as this, especially if you are using call() or apply() anywhere.

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var MyMethod ={
MyFunction1: function(myData)
    {
        /// ...
       return  this.MyFunction2([myData]);
    },

MyFunction2: function(data)
    {
        // ...
        return data;
    },
};
var res = MyMethod.MyFunction1('a');
alert(res);
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1  
this refers to the head object (MyMethod). So this is correct. –  chovy Sep 5 '13 at 5:56
    
@chovy not necessarily, eg MyMethod.MyFunction1.call({}, someData) –  Phil Sep 5 '13 at 5:59
    
var res =MyMethod.MyFunction1.call(MyMethod, 'a') this will again work –  Arun Killu Sep 5 '13 at 6:06
    
@ArunKillu The point is, you cannot guarantee that the object referred to by this in MyFunction1 will be MyMethod. Anything that makes use of this code may call MyMethod.MyFunction1 with any this context it wants –  Phil Sep 5 '13 at 6:08
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The method is not global, it's a member of the object, so you need to use this to access it, and the colon is not part of the identifier:

this.MyFunction2([myData]);
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var MyMethod = {

    MyFunction1: function (myData) {
        /// ...
       return  this.MyFunction2([myData]);

    },

    MyFunction2: function (data) {
        // ...
       return data;
    },
};
  • here you have an object Mymethod,which has Myfunction1 as its property and the function you assigned it as its value.
  • So whenevr you want to access some value of an property,It should always be in the below manner:

MyObject.Property//similar to Mymethod.MyFunction2(param)

Before knowing the syntax ,I think you should know what is the meaning of object,property and method is:

Object:An object is a thing that has properties. Properties have names and values. The names are always strings (although we can write them without quotes most of the time), and the values can be anything JavaScript supports: Numbers, strings, booleans, null, undefined, or references to objects.

property: is simply a variable belonging to an object. A variable by itself is not a property. Properties and variables can hold any kind of data.

method:When a property holds a function it's called a method.

Simplest way to understand is by example:

var a = {
    b: function () {some code}
    };

    a //is an object
    b //is property of a     aka b is a method since it holds a function as its value.
    function () { //some code}//is property value aka value of b.
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BASmith:updated my answer..have a look,i think you are not clear about methods,objects,properties.. –  Vagabond Sep 5 '13 at 6:22
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