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I have a list of numbers in the text.txt file.
2.50
2.56
2.81
2.86
2.84
3.21
3.47
2.91
2.96
3.11
2.83
2.89
2.94
2.94
3.34
3.44
2.94
2.96
3.04
3.01
2.85
3.05
3.10

i want to bin each numbers of set of range. like how many in a range.
2.5-2.7
2.7-2.9
2.9-3.1
3.1-3.3
3.3-3.5

i have try this.

from __future__ import division
from math import *
from numpy import *
from string import*

infile = open('text1.txt', 'r')
text = infile.read().split('\n')
infile.close()
text.remove('')

numbers = []
for i in text:
count = 0
if (numbers[i] > 2.49) and (numbers[i] < 2.59):
    count += 1
    print("Number of elements", count)

it is not working

share|improve this question
    
Remember when you read the file they are first stored as strings so you have to convert them to ints first by calling str() –  Joowani Sep 5 '13 at 6:12
    
How should boundary cases be handled — which bin should value 3.10 go into? –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 5 '13 at 6:30
1  
Consider accepting one of the answers or clarifying why they don't solve your problem. –  chthonicdaemon Sep 6 '13 at 5:28

6 Answers 6

You can use the bisect module:

>>> import bisect
>>> ranges = [2.5, 2.7, 2.9, 3.1, 3.3, 3.5]
>>> nums = [2.5, 2.56, 2.81, 2.86, 2.84, 3.21, 3.47, 2.91, 2.96, 3.11, 2.83, 2.89, 2.94, 2.94, 3.34, 3.44, 2.94, 2.96, 3.04, 3.01, 2.85, 3.05, 3.1]
>>> lis = [0]*len(ranges)
for item in nums:
    ind = bisect.bisect(ranges, item) - 1
   lis[ind] += 1
for x, y in zip(zip(ranges, ranges[1:]), lis):
   print x, y
...     
(2.5, 2.7) 2
(2.7, 2.9) 6
(2.9, 3.1) 9
(3.1, 3.3) 3
(3.3, 3.5) 3
share|improve this answer
    
Dude, that's really elegant! +1! –  inspectorG4dget Sep 5 '13 at 6:14
    
In ranges the value 3.1 appears twice. Perhaps use bisect_left and then you don't need to subtract the one. I wonder how boundary cases should be handled — which bin should value 3.10 go into? –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 5 '13 at 6:25
2  
@StevenRumbalski Fixed that typo, I think bisect_right can be used if the OP wants 3.1 to fall into 3.1-3.3 and bisect_left if 3.1 belongs to 2.9-3.1. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 5 '13 at 6:41

How about using more of the numpy functions?

import numpy

numbers = numpy.loadtxt('test.txt')
bins = numpy.arange(2.5, 3.51, 0.2) #  3.5 won't work due to floating point issues
counts, _ = numpy.histogram(numbers, bins)

If you don't want to use numpy, you can benefit by directly calculating what bin the numbers fall into for equal-size bins:

numbers = [float(n) for n in open('test.txt') if len(n.strip())]
start = 2.5
width = 0.2
end = 3.7

def position(n):
    return int((n - start)/width)

counts = [0 for i in range(position(end))]
for n in numbers:
    counts[position(n)] += 1
share|improve this answer
    
This should be the best solution! –  justhalf Sep 5 '13 at 6:23

That would not work, since you have nothing stored in numbers[].

numbers = []
count = 0
for i in text:
    numbers.append(int(i))
    count=count+1

count = 0
for i in text:
    if (numbers[i] > 2.49) and (numbers[i] < 2.59):
        count += 1
print("Number of elements", count)
share|improve this answer

First, you can improve your file reading using readlines() as such:

numbers = [float(i.strip()) for i in infile.readlines() if i is not '']

Next, for the bin counting, assuming the range of each bin is equal, you can create two variables specifying the start value and the delta:

start = 2.5
delta = 0.2
nBins = 5

Then you can use filter to get the count of each range as such:

counts = [len(filter(lambda x: start+delta*i <= x < start+delta*(i+1), numbers)) for i in xrange(nBins)]

and print the results:

for i,count in enumerate(counts):
    print "Number of elements in the range %.1f-%.1f: %d" % (start+delta*i,start+delta*(i+1),count)

Full code:

infile = open('text1.txt', 'r')
numbers = [float(i.strip()) for i in infile.readlines() if i is not '']

start = 2.5
delta = 0.2
nBins = 5

counts = [len(filter(lambda x: start+delta*i <= x < start+delta*(i+1), numbers)) for i in xrange(nBins)]

for i,count in enumerate(counts):
    print "Number of elements in the range %.1f-%.1f: %d" % (start+delta*i,start+delta*(i+1),count)
share|improve this answer
    
readlines is unnecessary. A file can be iterated over directly. –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 5 '13 at 6:35
1  
this is good one. –  lsb123 Sep 5 '13 at 6:41
    
yay, I got compliment from OP! =D @StevenRumbalski: I think it's better to store the values in an array first, since in my implementation we're going to iterate through the list many times. –  justhalf Sep 5 '13 at 7:13
1  
@justhalf: I believe you misunderstand. Your list comprehension has the same result as numbers = [float(i.strip()) for i in infile if i is not ''] without the readlines. –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 5 '13 at 14:08
    
I see, I didn't know that. Thanks for that! =D –  justhalf Sep 5 '13 at 14:14

Try this:

ranges = [(2.5, 2.7), (2.7, 2.9), (2.9, 3.1), (3.1, 3.3), (3.3, 3.5)]
counts = {i:0 for i in ranges}

def findBin(n, bins):
    mid = len(bins)/2
    low, high = bins[mid]
    if low <= n <= high:
        return (low,high)
    elif low >= n:
        return findBin(n, bins[mid:])
    else:
        return findBin(n, bins[:mid])

with open('path/to/file') as infile:
    for line in infile:
        n = float(line.strip())
        counts[findBin(n, ranges)] += 1

for low,high in sorted(counts):
    print("There are", counts[(low,high)], "many numbers between", low, "and", high)

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer

You can use the following codes

infile = open('text1.txt','r')
text = infile.read().split('\n')
infile.close()
#text.remove('')

#calculate the numbers of each range
numbers = [0,0,0,0,0]
for i in text:
    temp = float(i);
    temp = (temp-2.5)*100
    temp = int(temp)/20
    numbers[temp] =numbers[temp] + 1  

#display the numbers of each range
print 'Number of elements'
print '2.5-2.7: '+ str(numbers[0])
print '2.7-2.9: '+ str(numbers[1]) 
print '2.9-3.1: '+ str(numbers[2])
print '3.1-3.3: '+ str(numbers[3])
print '3.3-3.5: '+ str(numbers[4])
share|improve this answer
    
so in this code the line "temp = float(i);" is not working. error: ValueError: could not convert string to float: –  lsb123 Sep 5 '13 at 6:44
    
I have run it with python 2.7, it works well. Do you use the python 3.x? –  Hao Dong Sep 5 '13 at 13:41

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