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I have a problem, when I try to compile my project in Oracle Database. To make it more simple, I have three objects: 2 packages (UTILS and TYPES) and 1 view (VIEW).

Package UTILS is using types defined in package TYPES. Package TYPES is using VIEW as a base for one of it's types. And VIEW is using functions from package UTILS in it's script. When I try to make some changes to one of these objects, I can't compile because everything is in invalid state. So some kind of object dependency loop is created.

Please help me to resolve this issue.

For example, is there anyway to compile the below code? Each object is individually syntactically correct, but how can they all be compiled together?

create or replace package my_types is
   type type1 is table of number;
   type type2 is table of my_view%rowtype;
end;
/

create or replace package my_utils is
   function get_1 return number;
   procedure do_something(parameter my_types.type2);
end;
/

create or replace package body my_utils is
   function get_1 return number is
   begin
       return 1;
   end;

   procedure do_something(parameter my_types.type2) is
   begin
       null;
   end;
end;
/

create or replace force view my_view as
select * from dual
where 1 = my_utils.get_1();

exec dbms_utility.compile_schema(user, false);

select object_name from user_objects where status <> 'VALID';
share|improve this question
    
Break the cycle? Make the execution of the functions a run-time effect (instead of baked into the query) -- e.g: EXECUTE the function from a string. –  David-SkyMesh Sep 5 '13 at 8:11
    
SO breaking the loop is the only way out of this problem? I thought that there could be some king of a hint when compiling package/view to ignore the invalid state of it's dependencies. –  artbro Sep 5 '13 at 8:16
    
No idea -- you'll want some oracle know-it-all :-) I'm more familiar with Postgres and that's how I'd do it there. (it doesn't suffer from that exact issue, but you can still create dependency loops). –  David-SkyMesh Sep 5 '13 at 8:18
2  
The only sensible approach is to break the cycle, as suggested by @David-SkyMesh. Could you add the code to your question, please? –  Frank Schmitt Sep 5 '13 at 10:25
1  
@jonearles - I'm sure you've already looked at this, but UTL_RECOMP can't resolve it, directly or through utlrp, which is interesting. Suggests it isn't solvable in this version I think, without splitting things up anyway. –  Alex Poole Sep 12 '13 at 18:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

If you don't want to / cannot split your package or view, you can always create a dummy version of your view first, compile the packages, and create the "real" view afterwards:

create or replace package my_types is
   type type1 is table of number;
   type type2 is table of my_view%rowtype;
end;
/

create or replace package my_utils is
   function get_1 return number;
   procedure do_something(parameter my_types.type2);
end;
/

create or replace package body my_utils is
   function get_1 return number is
   begin
       return 1;
   end;

   procedure do_something(parameter my_types.type2) is
   begin
       null;
   end;
end;
/

create or replace force view my_view as
select * from dual;

exec dbms_utility.compile_schema(user, false);

create or replace force view my_view as
select * from dual
where 1 = my_utils.get_1();

select object_name from user_objects where status <> 'VALID';
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work on 11.2.0.3.0. The dummy-version trick works for simple 2-way dependencies, but does not seem to work in this situation. –  Jon Heller Sep 11 '13 at 13:33
1  
@jonearles I tested it on 11.1.0.6, where it works fine. If you test it on 11.2.0.3 - are all objects invalid after recompiling? –  Frank Schmitt Sep 11 '13 at 13:58
1  
Yes, they are all invalid. It also fails on Express Edition, 11.2.0.2, here's a SQL Fiddle. Perhaps it's a bug in 11.2, but I couldn't find anything on Oracle Support. –  Jon Heller Sep 11 '13 at 17:07
3  
This approach works on 10.2.0.5 as well, so the problem certainly seems to be something new in 11gR2. –  Alex Poole Sep 12 '13 at 18:04

If you break view in two views, you can break cyclic dependency:

create or replace view my_view_1
as select * from dual; 

create or replace package my_types is
   type type1 is table of number;
   type type2 is table of my_view_1%rowtype;
end;
/

create or replace package my_utils is
   function get_1 return number;
   procedure do_something(parameter my_types.type2);
end;
/

create or replace package body my_utils is
   function get_1 return number is
   begin
       return 1;
   end;

   procedure do_something(parameter my_types.type2) is
   begin
       null;
   end;
end;
/

create or replace view my_view as
select * from my_view_1
where 1 = my_utils.get_1();

EDIT: Another possibility is to break package my_utils in two:

create or replace package my_utils_1 is
   function get_1 return number;
end;
/
create or replace package body my_utils_1 is
   function get_1 return number is
   begin
       return 1;
   end;
end;
/

create or replace view my_view as
select * from dual
where 1 = my_utils_1.get_1();

create or replace package my_types is
   type type1 is table of number;
   type type2 is table of my_view%rowtype;
end;
/

create or replace package my_utils_2 is
   procedure do_something(parameter my_types.type2);
end;
/
create or replace package body my_utils_2 is
   procedure do_something(parameter my_types.type2) is
   begin
       null;
   end;
end;
/
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is a possible solution, but for the bounty I'm looking for something a little better. Creating two views is not ideal because they need to be kept in sync. And in a more realistic scenario the view could not be so easily split without duplicating a lot of logic. –  Jon Heller Sep 10 '13 at 23:30

I'd refrain from using packaged types and %ROWTYPE. These are not standard SQL and can be replaced by Structured Types

create or replace view my_view_1
as select * from dual; 

create or replace type type1 as table of number;
create or replace type type2 as object (DUMMY VARCHAR2(1 byte));
create or replace type table_type2 as table of type2;

create or replace package my_utils is
   function get_1 return number;
   procedure do_something(parameter table_type2);
end;
/

create or replace package body my_utils is
   function get_1 return number is
   begin
       return 1;
   end;

   procedure do_something(parameter table_type2) is
   begin
       null;
   end;
end;
/

create or replace view my_view as
select * from my_view_1
where 1 = my_utils.get_1();
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure what standard SQL brings to the table here. Depending of object type usage (which we do not see here), it may penalize performance... –  igr Sep 14 '13 at 14:57
    
Packaged types and %ROWTYPE can be used only in PL/SQL. You cannot SELECT them using SQL queries or views. Performance-wise they won't be much different –  HAL 9000 Sep 15 '13 at 6:42

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