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I have a so-called signal_table in Oracle 11G which has the columns below:

signal_type VarChar(2)
signal_time VarChar(2)

signal_time has a format HH24:MI:SS (e.g. "15:35:30"), which means that an application fires this type of signal at 15:35:30 every day.

Now, I am trying to write a query which lists up all the signals that are due to be fired in 30 seconds from now.

I tried something like

select  
  signal_type,  
  signal_time,  
from  
  signal_table  
where  
  to_number(to_char(substr(signal_time,1,2)))*3600 + to_number(to_char(substr(signal_time,4,2)))*60 + to_number(to_char(substr(signal_time,7,2))) - to_number(to_char(sysdate,'HH24'))*3600 + to_number(to_char(sysdate,'MI'))*60 + to_number(to_char(sysdate,'SS')) < 30
;

thinking that I would convert the VarChar time stamps to numbers in seconds.
However, to the above query I got "ORA-01722: invalid number" error.

The query like below works OK:

select  
  signal_type,  
  signal_time,  
  to_number(to_char( substr(signal_time,1,2)))*3600 + to_number(to_char(substr(signal_time,4,2)))*60 + to_number(to_char(substr(signal_time,7,2))) - to_number(to_char(sysdate,'HH24'))*3600 + to_number(to_char(sysdate,'MI'))*60 + to_number(to_char(sysdate,'SS'))
from  
  signal_table  
;

Can anyone shed a light onto why I get the above error when I put the to_number cast portion in where clause?

Better still, is there a more elegant way to achieve this goal?

share|improve this question
    
1. you'l not able to store 15:35:30 in your given datatype, varchar(2). 2. It not seems any error on your first select query. 3. your select query has extra comma that is error –  ajmalmhd04 Sep 5 '13 at 9:40
1  
Will your logic work for a signal time of 00:00:15? –  David Aldridge Sep 5 '13 at 10:42

2 Answers 2

SELECT
TO_CHAR(TO_DATE(signal_time, 'HH24:MI:SS'),  'HH24:MI:SS') - TO_CHAR(NOW(),  'HH24:MI:SS')
;
share|improve this answer
    
There is no now() function in Oracle. –  a_horse_with_no_name Sep 5 '13 at 10:25
    
now() isn't an Oracle function, you'd need to use sysdate. More importantly, what would subtracting one string from another give you? Oracle would complain about ORA-01722 again, as it would try to implicitly convert both strings to numbers, which would fail. –  Alex Poole Sep 5 '13 at 10:26
    
Thanks for the suggestions. I actually did try converting signal_time to date format, too, but got "ORA-01830: date format picture ends before converting entire input string." As I posted as the comments to the other answer thread from Alex, it might be due to the fact that there actually were some records in the table that do not conform to the format. I have not been able to get around that so far... –  akisoni Sep 6 '13 at 6:40

What you've done works (up to a point) as long as all the data in the table does really have values in nn:nn:nn format. The error suggests you have at least one row that is formatted incorrectly. Although it's odd that your second query works - maybe you have a where clause you haven't shown?

Here's an SQL Fiddle showing it action. It doesn't error, but it shows you all the signal times that have already passed for today, so you need to restrict it to be between the current time and thirty seconds form now, if I've understood you. This fiddle does that, and also removes some unnecessary conversions:

select  
  signal_type,
  signal_time
from
  signal_table
where  
  (to_number(substr(signal_time,1,2))*3600
    + to_number(substr(signal_time,4,2))*60
    + to_number(substr(signal_time,7,2)))
    - (to_number(to_char(sysdate,'HH24'))*3600
    + to_number(to_char(sysdate,'MI'))*60
    + to_number(to_char(sysdate,'SS'))) >= 0
and
  (to_number(substr(signal_time,1,2))*3600
    + to_number(substr(signal_time,4,2))*60
    + to_number(substr(signal_time,7,2)))
    - (to_number(to_char(sysdate,'HH24'))*3600
    + to_number(to_char(sysdate,'MI'))*60
    + to_number(to_char(sysdate,'SS'))) < 30
;

You could also convert the signal_time into a date and compare that with sysdate:

select
  signal_type,
  signal_time
from
  signal_table
where
  to_date(signal_time, 'HH24:MI:SS') - trunc(sysdate, 'MM')
    >= sysdate - trunc(sysdate, 'DD')
  and to_date(signal_time, 'HH24:MI:SS') - trunc(sysdate, 'MM')
    < sysdate + interval '30' second - trunc(sysdate, 'DD')
;

Yet another fiddle. This extracts the time portion as a fraction of a day, for the signal_time, current time and current time + 30 seconds.

To find values which are not formatted correctly, a quick check would be something like:

select
  signal_type,
  signal_time
from
  signal_table
where
  not regexp_like(signal_time, '^\d\d:\d\d:\d\d$')
;

(I'm not too hot on regex so that can probably be done more neatly). That will only find badly formatted values though, and won't spot invalid times, e.g. 24:60:60, which your query will convert. The date version would complain about that (ORA-01850), but would also be more forgiving of slightly varied formats, e.g. missing a leading zero on one of the elements. Which may or may not be a good thing.


If you have records in a different format that you need to exclude, but cannot correct, then (apart from suggesting a data model problem) you can use the check query as a subquery in your main one:

select
  signal_type,
  signal_time
from
  (
    select
      *
    from
      signal_table
    where
      regexp_like(signal_time, '^\d\d:\d\d:\d\d$')
  )
where
  to_date(signal_time, 'HH24:MI:SS') - trunc(sysdate, 'MM')
    > sysdate - trunc(sysdate, 'DD')
  and to_date(signal_time, 'HH24:MI:SS') - trunc(sysdate, 'MM')
    < sysdate + interval '30' second - trunc(sysdate, 'DD')
;

Another fiddle showing this working, and then the earlier simpler query failing, with the same data - including one bad record.

It will still fail if you have valid formatting but invalid times (e.g. 24:60:60). If that is the case then you really need to clean your data, but could maybe come up with a more restrictive regex, or use a function something like this to check for valid formats at runtime.

In some cases you might need to add hints to stop the filter being applied to the inner select but I don't think that will be an issue in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Alex for your reply. Actually, the real culprit might be the non-conforming records. In the real table for which I am writing this query, there are 2 records of which signal_time values are of different format. I tried this select signal_type, signal_time from signal_table where to_date(signal_time, 'HH24:MI:SS') - trunc(sysdate, 'MM') >= sysdate - trunc(sysdate, 'DD') and to_date(signal_time, 'HH24:MI:SS') - trunc(sysdate, 'MM') < sysdate + interval '30' second - trunc(sysdate, 'DD') and signal_type != 'AAA' and signal_type != 'BBB' but I got ORA-01830 error. –  akisoni Sep 6 '13 at 6:07
    
I also tried something like below with pure_signal as( select signal_type, signal_time from signal_table where signal_type != 'AAA' and signal_type != 'BBB' ) select * from pure_signal where to_date(signal_time, 'HH24:MI:SS') - trunc(sysdate, 'MM') >= sysdate - trunc(sysdate, 'DD') and to_date(signal_time, 'HH24:MI:SS') - trunc(sysdate, 'MM') < sysdate + interval '30' second - trunc(sysdate, 'DD') –  akisoni Sep 6 '13 at 6:20
    
To the above query, I got "ORA-01830: date format picture ends before converting entire input string" Unfortunately, I don't have the privilege to create a temporary table in production... –  akisoni Sep 6 '13 at 6:29
    
Sorry, these comments look pretty confusing... I wish I could format it in the same way as the original post... –  akisoni Sep 6 '13 at 6:31
    
@akisoni - do those two records legitimately have a different format (surely not?), or can they be fixed? Does their data have to be included in the query, and if so what format are they in? –  Alex Poole Sep 6 '13 at 7:20

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