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First of all, i am new to both Test Driven Development (TDD) and Behaviour Driven Development (BDD) and i am having a hard time believing that this is a good way of developing web pages since the pages often needs to be developed in a rapid manner, which is hard if you have to develop test code before you can do anything.

Any ways!

The reason that i am writing this thread is not because of, what i find to be, issue (but if you have input i would enjoy reading that as well!). I have been reading some about syntax, how it works, and all of that. I discovered though that the approach is hard to implement if my function doesn't return a value.

Let's say for instance that i have a click-event triggered function that merely changes a text value of a input:

$('input[type="text"]').click(function() {
    $(this).val('Oh, that tickles!');
});

How does jasmine handle this? Like the following code?:

describe('Input type text is clicked', function () {  
    it('changes text in the input field', function () {  
        expect($('input[type="text"]').val()).toEqual("Oh, that tickles!");  
    });  
});

This is although wrong, since the jQuery object can contain multiple input fields that does not contain that value. Is there any ways of finding the element (such as $(this) or similar), or should I put a click-handler inside the jasmine test? Like this:

describe('Input type text is clicked', function () {  
    it('changes text in the input field', function () {
        $('input[type="text"]').click(function() {
            expect($(this).val()).toEqual("Oh, that tickles!");
        }  
    });  
});

Some clarity would be nice :)

Thanks a lot in advance!

/J.

share|improve this question
    
I'm struggling with this too. But I just put everything in a function that does the 'logic' and gives a return value, then have a jquery event handle the rest. I only test the function. –  Gerben Jacobs Sep 5 '13 at 14:25
    
Ofc, this is a solution as well. All though there will be times when you really want to test your code inside an event (that typically don't return a value). Xn.s' answer was very helpful, check that. :) –  Jari Sep 6 '13 at 7:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One approach is to make sure there is only one text input field when the test is run. You can use jasmine-jquery to create a fixture with the input field:

describe('Input type text is clicked', function () {  
  beforeEach(function() {
    jasmine.getFixtures().set('<input type="text" />');
    bindClickEvent();
  });
  it('changes text in the input field', function () {
    $('input[type="text"]').click();
    expect($('input[type="text"]').val()).toEqual("Oh, that tickles!");  
  });  
});

You may want to refactor up your code so you can test that the click event is handled separately the click handler itself:

var eventHandlers = {
  tickle: function() {
    $(this).val('Oh, that tickles!');
  }
};    
$('input[type="text"]').click(eventHandlers.tickle);

Then you would have two tests:

describe('Input type text is clicked', function () {  
  beforeEach(function() {
    jasmine.getFixtures().set('<input type="text" />');
    spyOn(eventHandlers, 'tickle');
    bindClickEvent();
  });
  it('should tickle the field', function () {
    $('input[type="text"]').click();
    expect(eventHandler.tickle).toHaveBeenCalled();
  });  
});

describe('eventHandlers.tickle', function () {  
  it('should set the field value', function () {
    var input = $('<input type="text"/>');
    eventHandlers.tickle.call(input);
    expect(input.val()).toBe("Oh, that tickles!");
  });  
});
share|improve this answer
    
This was very helpful. However, this kinda confirms that you need to put considerate amount of time in developing for your test. Is it really worth the time when you develop in large scale? –  Jari Sep 6 '13 at 7:53
1  
It becomes less time consuming as you do it a bit. If you're starting to write specs for an existing large code base, start with something simple to get comfortable writing them, then move to the most complicated areas. You'll find that if the tests are especially hard to write, the code is probably overly complicated and would benefit from refactoring. Your code quality should improve as test coverage increases. As the specs grow to more fully specify how the app works, you'll find they both serve as valuable documentation and reduce regression bugs. –  xn. Sep 6 '13 at 19:30
    
That actually makes sense to me. Thank you a lot for your help! –  Jari Sep 9 '13 at 8:06

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