Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a plain C program. I have made an executable of it. If I read an elf file, it says me that the entry point is Entry point address: 0x80482e0. After tracking the entry point, I see that the final call is the following.

080482b0 <__gmon_start__@plt-0x10>:
 80482b0:   ff 35 50 96 04 08       pushl  0x8049650
 80482b6:   ff 25 54 96 04 08       jmp    *0x8049654
 80482bc:   00 00                   add    %al,(%eax)

How can I hack the value of 0x8049654 to call some other function rather than main? I believe the main function address will be stored at the address - 0x8049654? Am I correct? What I want to do is that instead of calling main(), I want to hack it to call some other function? Is it possible?

Is the main function address should be contained in the *0x8049654 ?

share|improve this question
    
Do you want this "hack" to be permanent and self-contained, or would a $LD_PRELOAD trick work for you? –  trojanfoe Sep 5 '13 at 10:36
    
You want to modify the binary file ? Have you the address of the function you want to call ? –  Michael Sep 5 '13 at 10:42
    
No, I am looking for a permanent and self-contained option. –  SHREYAS JOSHI Sep 5 '13 at 10:42
    
@ Michael, I have a second binary. Here, I can find the address of the function and print it. This binary will be keep running - while(1). Now, In the original binary, I want to specify the main function entry point as the newer one - function (from the first binary). –  SHREYAS JOSHI Sep 5 '13 at 10:45
    
I'm not sure to understand on what your second binary file (and its infinite loop) can be useful. The address of your function in the two binaries are not the same. Use objdump instead. –  Michael Sep 5 '13 at 10:56
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

main is not called from __gmon_start__:

(gdb) disassemble main 
Dump of assembler code for function main:
0x080483d8 <main+0>:    push   %ebp                       // main() address
0x080483d9 <main+1>:    mov    %esp,%ebp
0x080483db <main+3>:    and    $0xfffffff0,%esp
0x080483de <main+6>:    sub    $0x10,%esp
0x080483e1 <main+9>:    movl   $0x80484c9,(%esp)
0x080483e8 <main+16>:   call   0x80482f8 <puts@plt>
0x080483ed <main+21>:   mov    $0x0,%eax
0x080483f2 <main+26>:   leave  
0x080483f3 <main+27>:   ret    
End of assembler dump.
(gdb) disassemble __gmon_start__
Dump of assembler code for function __gmon_start__@plt:
0x080482d8 <__gmon_start__@plt+0>:  jmp    *0x80495c8
0x080482de <__gmon_start__@plt+6>:  push   $0x0
0x080482e3 <__gmon_start__@plt+11>: jmp    0x80482c8
End of assembler dump.
(gdb) # no call to main

it's got passed from the function _start:

(gdb) disassemble _start 
Dump of assembler code for function _start:
0x08048310 <_start+0>:  xor    %ebp,%ebp
0x08048312 <_start+2>:  pop    %esi
0x08048313 <_start+3>:  mov    %esp,%ecx
0x08048315 <_start+5>:  and    $0xfffffff0,%esp
0x08048318 <_start+8>:  push   %eax
0x08048319 <_start+9>:  push   %esp
0x0804831a <_start+10>: push   %edx
0x0804831b <_start+11>: push   $0x8048400
0x08048320 <_start+16>: push   $0x8048410
0x08048325 <_start+21>: push   %ecx
0x08048326 <_start+22>: push   %esi
0x08048327 <_start+23>: push   $0x80483d8
0x0804832c <_start+28>: call   0x80482e8 <__libc_start_main@plt>
0x08048331 <_start+33>: hlt    
0x08048332 <_start+34>: nop
...

You can read the ELF header and you will find the address of _start stored in e_entry:

   e_entry     This member gives the virtual address to which the system
               first transfers control, thus starting the process.  If
               the file has no associated entry point, this member holds
               zero.

Here a simple program to get the address:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <elf.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  FILE *file;
  Elf32_Ehdr hdr;

  if( argc < 2 ) {
    printf("uage: %s [FILE]\n", argv[0]);
    return -1;
  }

  if( (file = fopen(argv[1], "r")) == NULL ) {
    perror("Error");
    return -1;
  }

  fread(&hdr, sizeof(Elf32_Ehdr), 1, file);
  fclose(file);

  if( (hdr.e_ident[EI_MAG0] != ELFMAG0) ||
    (hdr.e_ident[EI_MAG1] != ELFMAG1) ||
    (hdr.e_ident[EI_MAG2] != ELFMAG2) ||
    (hdr.e_ident[EI_MAG3] != ELFMAG3) ) {
    printf("Error: Error: Not a valid ELF file.\n");
    return -1;
  }

  printf("Entry: 0x%.8x\n", hdr.e_entry);

  return 0;
}

So if you want to redirect main to other function, you need to patch this part:

0x08048327 <_start+23>: push   $0x80483d8

and replace it with your function. Here I have a simple program:

#include <stdio.h>

void function(void) {
  puts("Function");
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

  puts("Main");

  return 0;
}

Will print:

$ ./prog1
Main
$

We need to figure out the address of main and function, using readelf:

$ readelf -s prog1

Symbol table '.dynsym' contains 5 entries:
...

Symbol table '.symtab' contains 66 entries:
   Num:    Value  Size Type    Bind   Vis      Ndx Name
...
    61: 080483c4    20 FUNC    GLOBAL DEFAULT   14 function
...
    64: 080483d8    28 FUNC    GLOBAL DEFAULT   14 main
...
$ 

now patch that push $0x80483d8 and replace the address of main = 080483d8 with function = 080483c4, I used a hex editor, don't forgot to flip the bytes in revere order. It will become:

0x08048327 <_start+23>: push   $0x80483c4

now test it:

$ ./prog1
Function
$ 

Reference: How main() is executed on Linux


That was a quick and dirty way of doing it. If you just want to call something before main is called, you can make function a constructor using GCC attribute __attribute__((constructor)) like this:

#include <stdio.h>

__attribute__((constructor)) void function(void) {
  puts("Function");
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

  puts("Main");

  return 0;
}

Now it will be called before main:

$ gcc -Wall prog.c -o prog
$ ./prog
Function
Main
$ 

Reference: Declaring Attributes of Functions

share|improve this answer
1  
I liked this answer, thank u very much!! –  SHREYAS JOSHI Sep 5 '13 at 14:55
add comment

The entry point as described in your Elf file is not your main() function. main() is first as far as the C language is concerned, but the operating system has other needs (depending on the OS and the compiler). For GCC for example, your initial entry point is likely coming from assembly code in crt0.o; this code handles whatever basic initialization is required and then calls main().

While it's possible to perform a binary edit, it's certainly not trivial and assuming you have source to the code, it's highly questionable as to what benefit you would have in doing so.

share|improve this answer
    
I am saying that the main function is available at the *0x8049654. Look at the below. <__gmon_start__@plt-0x10>: 80482b0: ff 35 50 96 04 08 pushl 0x8049650 80482b6: ff 25 54 96 04 08 jmp *0x8049654 80482bc: 00 00 add %al,(%eax) –  SHREYAS JOSHI Sep 5 '13 at 10:53
    
That's fine... as I said though, you could perform a binary edit but it's not trivial (though having an absolute address as is the case here makes it easier than if it were a relative jump); not only isn't it recommended but it's strongly discouraged. Rather than spend time searching for the location to edit in the elf, why aren't you just rebuilding the binary? –  mah Sep 5 '13 at 10:59
    
Is the main function address should be contained in the *0x8049654 ? –  SHREYAS JOSHI Sep 5 '13 at 12:17
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.