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I have created two interfaces I1 and I2. I have inherited those two interfaces to an abstract class.
The interfaces I1 and I2 has the same method Add(), How to implement this in the derived class using explicit interface?

Code Snippet:

using System;

interface I1
{
    void Add(int _fn, int _sn);
    void Prod(int _fn, int _sn);
    void Sub(int _fn, int _sn);
}

interface I2
{
    void Add(int _fn, int _sn);
}

abstract class Simple: I2, I1
{
    public abstract void Add(int _fn, int _sn);
    public abstract void Prod(int _fn, int _sn);
    public abstract void Sub(int _fn, int _sn);
    void I2.Add(int _fn, int _sn);
}


class Program : Simple
{
    public override void Add(int _fn, int _sn)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(_fn+_sn);
    }

    public override void Prod(int _fn, int _sn)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(_fn * _sn);
    }

    public override void Sub(int _fn, int _sn)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(_fn - _sn);
    }

    void Add(int _fn, int _sn)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(_fn % _sn);
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        I1 inter = new Program();

        inter.Add(2, 3);
        inter.Prod(2, 4);
        inter.Sub(3,5);
    }
}

I am getting an error:

Type 'Program' already defines a member called 'Add' with the same parameter types

Can anyone help me with this. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
There isn't any point in using two Add() methods that do the exact same thing. The abstract Simple.Add() already implements both I1.Add and I2.Add. So just get rid of the explicit interface implementation and the unneeded Program.Add(). And write proper code, an abstract method cannot have a body. –  Hans Passant Sep 5 '13 at 12:11
    
I have edited my code to give you a better picture of what I want. –  arun Sep 5 '13 at 12:22
    
If you add body to Add in abstract Simple class the code compiles fine. Without the error you've provided. –  BartoszKP Sep 5 '13 at 12:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use an abstract method with a different name:

abstract class Simple: I2, I1
{
    public abstract void Add(int _fn, int _sn);
    public abstract void Prod(int _fn, int _sn);
    public abstract void Sub(int _fn, int _sn);
    void I2.Add(int _fn, int _sn)
    {
        AddInternal(_fn, _sn);
    }

    protected abstract void AddInternal(int _fn, int _sn);
}

And override it in the concrete class:

protected override void AddInternal(int _fn, int _sn)
{
    Console.WriteLine(_fn + _sn);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Where is the implementation of AddInternal? It just isn't needed. –  Hans Passant Sep 5 '13 at 12:37
    
@arun, yes, I fixed it –  Thomas Levesque Sep 5 '13 at 12:50
    
@arun, this works for me: gist.github.com/thomaslevesque/735f852c2a396bd7a639 –  Thomas Levesque Sep 5 '13 at 13:35
    
Yes yes I rechecked.. it works. Thanks –  arun Sep 5 '13 at 16:01

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